Katy Bridge is coming down


Ardell Ivy, of APAC Construction, adjusts the flame on the torch he used late Tuesday evening while cutting a section of the metal deck frame on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. Workers of the construction firm have spent six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. removing the deck structure on the three sections of the bridge. The bridge is being replaced with a new structure that will raise the existing height from a clearance of 13 feet, 9 inches to a clearance of more than 16 feet, making it an unclassified bridge. New safety, including taller fencing, will also be added to the bridge once it is completed. Work on the project is expected to be completed in early June, weather permitting.


Sparks from cutting torches land on East Broadway Boulevard after Ardell Ivy and Brandon Bonecutter work on freeing the sections of the steel deck on one section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge late Tuesday night. The two men stood on a scissor lift to raise them to the needed height of the bridge decking. Both men wore safety harnesses throughout their work to protect them from the 14-foot height they were working at.


Tyler Ellebracht, a laborer with APAC and Mark Shepard, machine driver, work to replace the chisel point on a track hoe Tuesday evening. The device was used to break the concrete decking on the Katy Trail Bridge Overpass. Shepard said the work on the bridge replacement was going fairly easy. Tuesday night marked the sixth night a section of East Broadway Boulevard had been closed to allow workers to remove the bridge prior to its replacement.


The chisel end attachment of a track hoe operated by Mark Shephard lifts a piece of concrete decking for removal. Workers were hoping to remove all decking and sub structures on the bridge Wednesday evening before removing the steel support beams of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. The original structure that spans East Broadway Boulevard was first built in 1936.


Ardell Ivy sits atop a section of the steel decking on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge as he works to cut the section away from the steel support beams Tuesday night.


A 19-foot section of the steel floor decking is lifted from the remaining support beams by Dustin Hudson, driver and crane operator. Workers would eventually lower the structure on a flat bed truck where it was taken to Advantage Metal of Sedalia to be sold for scrap, according to Bean Storgoham, project manager from APAC Construction who was supervising the night work on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge removal. Storgoham said the project was going as planned, but each of the three decks were built in a slightly different manner, causing slight adjustments to be made in the removal of each section.


Tyler Ellebracht works to help guide a 19-foot steel section of the bridge decking onto a flat bed trailer Tuesday night. Workers were careful to remove the debris from the site each night after their demolition was completed. East Broadway Boulevard remained open during the days following the six nighttime road closures, necessitating the cleanup each evening.


Project manager Bean Storgohann watches as a 19-foot steel section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge is lowered on a flatbed truck Tuesday night. The construction workers had been on the job site six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. to remove the bridge that was first built in 1936. Work on the bridge began March 14 and is scheduled to be completed in 90 days, weather permitting. The replacement of the bridge is a joint venture between Pettis County, the City of Sedalia and MoDOT.


Ardell Ivy, of APAC Construction, adjusts the flame on the torch he used late Tuesday evening while cutting a section of the metal deck frame on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. Workers of the construction firm have spent six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. removing the deck structure on the three sections of the bridge. The bridge is being replaced with a new structure that will raise the existing height from a clearance of 13 feet, 9 inches to a clearance of more than 16 feet, making it an unclassified bridge. New safety, including taller fencing, will also be added to the bridge once it is completed. Work on the project is expected to be completed in early June, weather permitting.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy1.jpgArdell Ivy, of APAC Construction, adjusts the flame on the torch he used late Tuesday evening while cutting a section of the metal deck frame on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. Workers of the construction firm have spent six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. removing the deck structure on the three sections of the bridge. The bridge is being replaced with a new structure that will raise the existing height from a clearance of 13 feet, 9 inches to a clearance of more than 16 feet, making it an unclassified bridge. New safety, including taller fencing, will also be added to the bridge once it is completed. Work on the project is expected to be completed in early June, weather permitting.

Sparks from cutting torches land on East Broadway Boulevard after Ardell Ivy and Brandon Bonecutter work on freeing the sections of the steel deck on one section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge late Tuesday night. The two men stood on a scissor lift to raise them to the needed height of the bridge decking. Both men wore safety harnesses throughout their work to protect them from the 14-foot height they were working at.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy2.jpgSparks from cutting torches land on East Broadway Boulevard after Ardell Ivy and Brandon Bonecutter work on freeing the sections of the steel deck on one section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge late Tuesday night. The two men stood on a scissor lift to raise them to the needed height of the bridge decking. Both men wore safety harnesses throughout their work to protect them from the 14-foot height they were working at.

Tyler Ellebracht, a laborer with APAC and Mark Shepard, machine driver, work to replace the chisel point on a track hoe Tuesday evening. The device was used to break the concrete decking on the Katy Trail Bridge Overpass. Shepard said the work on the bridge replacement was going fairly easy. Tuesday night marked the sixth night a section of East Broadway Boulevard had been closed to allow workers to remove the bridge prior to its replacement.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy3.jpgTyler Ellebracht, a laborer with APAC and Mark Shepard, machine driver, work to replace the chisel point on a track hoe Tuesday evening. The device was used to break the concrete decking on the Katy Trail Bridge Overpass. Shepard said the work on the bridge replacement was going fairly easy. Tuesday night marked the sixth night a section of East Broadway Boulevard had been closed to allow workers to remove the bridge prior to its replacement.

The chisel end attachment of a track hoe operated by Mark Shephard lifts a piece of concrete decking for removal. Workers were hoping to remove all decking and sub structures on the bridge Wednesday evening before removing the steel support beams of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. The original structure that spans East Broadway Boulevard was first built in 1936.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy4.jpgThe chisel end attachment of a track hoe operated by Mark Shephard lifts a piece of concrete decking for removal. Workers were hoping to remove all decking and sub structures on the bridge Wednesday evening before removing the steel support beams of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. The original structure that spans East Broadway Boulevard was first built in 1936.

Ardell Ivy sits atop a section of the steel decking on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge as he works to cut the section away from the steel support beams Tuesday night.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy5.jpgArdell Ivy sits atop a section of the steel decking on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge as he works to cut the section away from the steel support beams Tuesday night.

A 19-foot section of the steel floor decking is lifted from the remaining support beams by Dustin Hudson, driver and crane operator. Workers would eventually lower the structure on a flat bed truck where it was taken to Advantage Metal of Sedalia to be sold for scrap, according to Bean Storgoham, project manager from APAC Construction who was supervising the night work on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge removal. Storgoham said the project was going as planned, but each of the three decks were built in a slightly different manner, causing slight adjustments to be made in the removal of each section.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy6.jpgA 19-foot section of the steel floor decking is lifted from the remaining support beams by Dustin Hudson, driver and crane operator. Workers would eventually lower the structure on a flat bed truck where it was taken to Advantage Metal of Sedalia to be sold for scrap, according to Bean Storgoham, project manager from APAC Construction who was supervising the night work on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge removal. Storgoham said the project was going as planned, but each of the three decks were built in a slightly different manner, causing slight adjustments to be made in the removal of each section.

Tyler Ellebracht works to help guide a 19-foot steel section of the bridge decking onto a flat bed trailer Tuesday night. Workers were careful to remove the debris from the site each night after their demolition was completed. East Broadway Boulevard remained open during the days following the six nighttime road closures, necessitating the cleanup each evening.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy7.jpgTyler Ellebracht works to help guide a 19-foot steel section of the bridge decking onto a flat bed trailer Tuesday night. Workers were careful to remove the debris from the site each night after their demolition was completed. East Broadway Boulevard remained open during the days following the six nighttime road closures, necessitating the cleanup each evening.

Project manager Bean Storgohann watches as a 19-foot steel section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge is lowered on a flatbed truck Tuesday night. The construction workers had been on the job site six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. to remove the bridge that was first built in 1936. Work on the bridge began March 14 and is scheduled to be completed in 90 days, weather permitting. The replacement of the bridge is a joint venture between Pettis County, the City of Sedalia and MoDOT.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032416katy8.jpgProject manager Bean Storgohann watches as a 19-foot steel section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge is lowered on a flatbed truck Tuesday night. The construction workers had been on the job site six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. to remove the bridge that was first built in 1936. Work on the bridge began March 14 and is scheduled to be completed in 90 days, weather permitting. The replacement of the bridge is a joint venture between Pettis County, the City of Sedalia and MoDOT.

Ardell Ivy, of APAC Construction, adjusts the flame on the torch he used late Tuesday evening while cutting a section of the metal deck frame on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. Workers of the construction firm have spent six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. removing the deck structure on the three sections of the bridge. The bridge is being replaced with a new structure that will raise the existing height from a clearance of 13 feet, 9 inches to a clearance of more than 16 feet, making it an unclassified bridge. New safety, including taller fencing, will also be added to the bridge once it is completed. Work on the project is expected to be completed in early June, weather permitting.

Sparks from cutting torches land on East Broadway Boulevard after Ardell Ivy and Brandon Bonecutter work on freeing the sections of the steel deck on one section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge late Tuesday night. The two men stood on a scissor lift to raise them to the needed height of the bridge decking. Both men wore safety harnesses throughout their work to protect them from the 14-foot height they were working at.

Tyler Ellebracht, a laborer with APAC and Mark Shepard, machine driver, work to replace the chisel point on a track hoe Tuesday evening. The device was used to break the concrete decking on the Katy Trail Bridge Overpass. Shepard said the work on the bridge replacement was going fairly easy. Tuesday night marked the sixth night a section of East Broadway Boulevard had been closed to allow workers to remove the bridge prior to its replacement.

The chisel end attachment of a track hoe operated by Mark Shephard lifts a piece of concrete decking for removal. Workers were hoping to remove all decking and sub structures on the bridge Wednesday evening before removing the steel support beams of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge. The original structure that spans East Broadway Boulevard was first built in 1936.

Ardell Ivy sits atop a section of the steel decking on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge as he works to cut the section away from the steel support beams Tuesday night.

A 19-foot section of the steel floor decking is lifted from the remaining support beams by Dustin Hudson, driver and crane operator. Workers would eventually lower the structure on a flat bed truck where it was taken to Advantage Metal of Sedalia to be sold for scrap, according to Bean Storgoham, project manager from APAC Construction who was supervising the night work on the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge removal. Storgoham said the project was going as planned, but each of the three decks were built in a slightly different manner, causing slight adjustments to be made in the removal of each section.

Tyler Ellebracht works to help guide a 19-foot steel section of the bridge decking onto a flat bed trailer Tuesday night. Workers were careful to remove the debris from the site each night after their demolition was completed. East Broadway Boulevard remained open during the days following the six nighttime road closures, necessitating the cleanup each evening.

Project manager Bean Storgohann watches as a 19-foot steel section of the Katy Trail Overpass Bridge is lowered on a flatbed truck Tuesday night. The construction workers had been on the job site six nights from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. to remove the bridge that was first built in 1936. Work on the bridge began March 14 and is scheduled to be completed in 90 days, weather permitting. The replacement of the bridge is a joint venture between Pettis County, the City of Sedalia and MoDOT.

Sedalia Democrat
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