Memories remain of Sedalia landmark


Eddie’s Drive In demolished Monday morning

The bucket of an excavator removes a section of the southeast wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. The old National Guard Armory Building is seen in the background.


John Cover uses an excavator to remove the debris left after the demolition of Eddie’s Drive Inn Monday morning. The metal and other material that could be was scheduled to be recycled once it was removed from the site.


J.R. Wehmeyer of B&P Excavating climbs over the debris from Eddie’s Drive Inn after it was demolished Monday morning. Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition, said all the metal, brick and rock that could be used from the building would be hauled off site, sorted and recycled. Slaughter added that it was sad to see the historic restaurant go but it was good to see new development in Sedalia.


John Cover of B&P Excavating works to remove all that remained of Eddie’s Drive In after it was taken down Monday morning. The landmark first opened in Sedalia as Garst’s in 1937. Several items from the restaurant had been removed from the building prior to the demolition, including the glass front door that featured the image of the Gueber Burger Peanut. The restaurant, along with the Wheel Inn Drive In, was known for their gueber burgers, a hamburger covered with peanut butter.


The north wall of Eddies Drive In remains standing as workers from B&P excavating of Sedalia work to level the structure early Monday morning. The historic Sedalia landmark, built in 1937, was originally called Garst’s, known for its classic steakburgers, gueber burgers, crinkle cuts fries, malts and cruise nights. The property was sold to Guesa USA LLC and is the site of a future urgent health care facility.


John Cover operates an excavator as he prepares to take down the west wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. One quarter of the drive through menu can still be seen on the board. Workers had the building down in 20 minutes, according to Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition from B&P Excavating. Workers remained to clean the site Monday morning.


Eddie’s Drive In demolished Monday morning

The bucket of an excavator removes a section of the southeast wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. The old National Guard Armory Building is seen in the background.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032916eddies3.jpgThe bucket of an excavator removes a section of the southeast wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. The old National Guard Armory Building is seen in the background.

John Cover uses an excavator to remove the debris left after the demolition of Eddie’s Drive Inn Monday morning. The metal and other material that could be was scheduled to be recycled once it was removed from the site.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032916eddies4.jpgJohn Cover uses an excavator to remove the debris left after the demolition of Eddie’s Drive Inn Monday morning. The metal and other material that could be was scheduled to be recycled once it was removed from the site.

J.R. Wehmeyer of B&P Excavating climbs over the debris from Eddie’s Drive Inn after it was demolished Monday morning. Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition, said all the metal, brick and rock that could be used from the building would be hauled off site, sorted and recycled. Slaughter added that it was sad to see the historic restaurant go but it was good to see new development in Sedalia.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032916eddies5.jpgJ.R. Wehmeyer of B&P Excavating climbs over the debris from Eddie’s Drive Inn after it was demolished Monday morning. Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition, said all the metal, brick and rock that could be used from the building would be hauled off site, sorted and recycled. Slaughter added that it was sad to see the historic restaurant go but it was good to see new development in Sedalia.

John Cover of B&P Excavating works to remove all that remained of Eddie’s Drive In after it was taken down Monday morning. The landmark first opened in Sedalia as Garst’s in 1937. Several items from the restaurant had been removed from the building prior to the demolition, including the glass front door that featured the image of the Gueber Burger Peanut. The restaurant, along with the Wheel Inn Drive In, was known for their gueber burgers, a hamburger covered with peanut butter.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032916eddies6.jpgJohn Cover of B&P Excavating works to remove all that remained of Eddie’s Drive In after it was taken down Monday morning. The landmark first opened in Sedalia as Garst’s in 1937. Several items from the restaurant had been removed from the building prior to the demolition, including the glass front door that featured the image of the Gueber Burger Peanut. The restaurant, along with the Wheel Inn Drive In, was known for their gueber burgers, a hamburger covered with peanut butter.

The north wall of Eddies Drive In remains standing as workers from B&P excavating of Sedalia work to level the structure early Monday morning. The historic Sedalia landmark, built in 1937, was originally called Garst’s, known for its classic steakburgers, gueber burgers, crinkle cuts fries, malts and cruise nights. The property was sold to Guesa USA LLC and is the site of a future urgent health care facility.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032916eddies1.jpgThe north wall of Eddies Drive In remains standing as workers from B&P excavating of Sedalia work to level the structure early Monday morning. The historic Sedalia landmark, built in 1937, was originally called Garst’s, known for its classic steakburgers, gueber burgers, crinkle cuts fries, malts and cruise nights. The property was sold to Guesa USA LLC and is the site of a future urgent health care facility.

John Cover operates an excavator as he prepares to take down the west wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. One quarter of the drive through menu can still be seen on the board. Workers had the building down in 20 minutes, according to Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition from B&P Excavating. Workers remained to clean the site Monday morning.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd032916eddies2.jpgJohn Cover operates an excavator as he prepares to take down the west wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. One quarter of the drive through menu can still be seen on the board. Workers had the building down in 20 minutes, according to Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition from B&P Excavating. Workers remained to clean the site Monday morning.

The bucket of an excavator removes a section of the southeast wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. The old National Guard Armory Building is seen in the background.

John Cover uses an excavator to remove the debris left after the demolition of Eddie’s Drive Inn Monday morning. The metal and other material that could be was scheduled to be recycled once it was removed from the site.

J.R. Wehmeyer of B&P Excavating climbs over the debris from Eddie’s Drive Inn after it was demolished Monday morning. Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition, said all the metal, brick and rock that could be used from the building would be hauled off site, sorted and recycled. Slaughter added that it was sad to see the historic restaurant go but it was good to see new development in Sedalia.

John Cover of B&P Excavating works to remove all that remained of Eddie’s Drive In after it was taken down Monday morning. The landmark first opened in Sedalia as Garst’s in 1937. Several items from the restaurant had been removed from the building prior to the demolition, including the glass front door that featured the image of the Gueber Burger Peanut. The restaurant, along with the Wheel Inn Drive In, was known for their gueber burgers, a hamburger covered with peanut butter.

The north wall of Eddies Drive In remains standing as workers from B&P excavating of Sedalia work to level the structure early Monday morning. The historic Sedalia landmark, built in 1937, was originally called Garst’s, known for its classic steakburgers, gueber burgers, crinkle cuts fries, malts and cruise nights. The property was sold to Guesa USA LLC and is the site of a future urgent health care facility.

John Cover operates an excavator as he prepares to take down the west wall of Eddie’s Drive In Monday morning. One quarter of the drive through menu can still be seen on the board. Workers had the building down in 20 minutes, according to Bob Slaughter, project manager for the demolition from B&P Excavating. Workers remained to clean the site Monday morning.

Sedalia Democrat
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