SC students make dolls to help abused children


By Randi Ulmer - Smith-Cotton High School



Smith-Cotton students Samantha Candelas and Leonela Leon work on their Fear Me Not dolls during teacher Amy Smith’s Clothing and Textiles class.


Student Helen Roerdanz created this Fear Me Not doll, named Bowbell. Roerdanz wrote that the doll’s special ability is that its voice sounds like bells ringing to make those around it happy.


By Randi Ulmer

Smith-Cotton High School

Smith-Cotton students Samantha Candelas and Leonela Leon work on their Fear Me Not dolls during teacher Amy Smith’s Clothing and Textiles class.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_FearMeNot1.jpgSmith-Cotton students Samantha Candelas and Leonela Leon work on their Fear Me Not dolls during teacher Amy Smith’s Clothing and Textiles class.

Student Helen Roerdanz created this Fear Me Not doll, named Bowbell. Roerdanz wrote that the doll’s special ability is that its voice sounds like bells ringing to make those around it happy.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_FearMeNot2.jpgStudent Helen Roerdanz created this Fear Me Not doll, named Bowbell. Roerdanz wrote that the doll’s special ability is that its voice sounds like bells ringing to make those around it happy.

Smith-Cotton High School students are helping children overcome their fears through a creative service project.

Clothing and Textile students made Fear Me Not Dolls and donated them to CASA, a foundation to help children who have been abused and neglected. Fear Me Not Dolls come with stories about how the dolls had fears and overcame them, so they help the children overcome their own fears.

Amy Smith, Family and Consumer Sciences teacher at Smith-Cotton, found the idea on a website for FACS teachers. Her students were learning about children and their bedtime fears. The dolls were handmade by the students with felt and other materials throughout the first semester of this school year. The goal is for the dolls to help comfort the children in difficult times.

“It’ll make the child feel like someone is always there for them and they’re never alone,” said sophomore Emily Kindle.

Another sophomore, Nadia Ostapenko, said the story for her doll was that it was always smiling so it makes bad people want to smile too. Smith said, “The students really got into these and got into writing the story that went along with them.”

Smith has already donated the dolls to CASA. Donna Hirner, a CASA employee, said the feeling she got when she received the dolls was indescribable.

“They will have a big impact because someone took time to sit down to make them,” Hirner said. The dolls will be going to children ages 6 to 13.

“It makes me feel like I’m making someone happy out there,” Ostapenko said.

Hirner said when she received these dolls it made her cry, and she believes they will make the children cry too.

“It shows other children care enough because they sat down and made these dolls,” said Hirner, who added that CASA and its clients are grateful for what the students did for them.

Randi Ulmer is a student at Smith-Cotton High School.

Sedalia Democrat

Randi Ulmer is a student at Smith-Cotton High School.

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