Rain and flooding affecting crops


By Faith Bemiss - [email protected]



With additional rain in the forecast for Pettis County, University of Missouri Extension Master Gardener Billie Long explains on Tuesday the effect of recent rains and flooding on crops in the local area.


Master Gardener Long said the soybean crop is being negatively affected by the flooding, such as this crop in the 25000 block of state Route V in south Pettis county. The plants are stunted and the ground was washed away in lower areas of the field.


On a positive note, Long said corn in Pettis County, such as this crop on south U.S. 65 Highway, is looking very healthy.


After flooding last week and overnight rains, water is still standing in the this vacant field Tuesday morning along state Route V in south Pettis County.


By Faith Bemiss

[email protected]

With additional rain in the forecast for Pettis County, University of Missouri Extension Master Gardener Billie Long explains on Tuesday the effect of recent rains and flooding on crops in the local area.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD070815Flooding-11.jpgWith additional rain in the forecast for Pettis County, University of Missouri Extension Master Gardener Billie Long explains on Tuesday the effect of recent rains and flooding on crops in the local area.

Master Gardener Long said the soybean crop is being negatively affected by the flooding, such as this crop in the 25000 block of state Route V in south Pettis county. The plants are stunted and the ground was washed away in lower areas of the field.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD070815Flooding-21.jpgMaster Gardener Long said the soybean crop is being negatively affected by the flooding, such as this crop in the 25000 block of state Route V in south Pettis county. The plants are stunted and the ground was washed away in lower areas of the field.

On a positive note, Long said corn in Pettis County, such as this crop on south U.S. 65 Highway, is looking very healthy.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD070815Flooding-31.jpgOn a positive note, Long said corn in Pettis County, such as this crop on south U.S. 65 Highway, is looking very healthy.

After flooding last week and overnight rains, water is still standing in the this vacant field Tuesday morning along state Route V in south Pettis County.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD070815Flooding-41.jpgAfter flooding last week and overnight rains, water is still standing in the this vacant field Tuesday morning along state Route V in south Pettis County.

Farmers often pray for rain, but that’s not the case in Pettis County. Some of the crops in the county are beginning to show signs of strain from excessive rain and subsequent flooding.

On a good note, the local corn crop is doing well, although soybeans are another story.

“The corn is up and tasseled and ears have formed,” University of Missouri Extension Master Gardener Billie Long said Tuesday. “I think it’s ahead of its time; it looks really good.”

Long was speaking for University of Missouri Extension Agriculture Business Specialist Brent Carpenter, who was out of the office attending a meeting.

Although some of the corn shows erosion around the roots from fast water run-off, Long said the majority of the crop, especially on higher ground, is doing well.

“In the lower parts (of the fields) some of it just drowned out,” she said. “There’s some places where you see it all yellow. In the low parts that’s washed out, they aren’t going to do well, but most of the corn looks really good. Fantastic for this time of year.

“Beans, however, are a little bit different,” she added. “They couldn’t get them in; the beans are in bad shape. It’s what I would consider poor for this time of year.”

Long added that the bean crop is “stunted.”

“There is just absolutely too much water,” she said. “Some of them, they couldn’t get in at the right time.”

Long noted that most of the winter wheat has already been harvested and has not been effected by the flooding.

“The winter wheat that I see has already been harvested,” she said. “It did not look like a bad harvest to me, it looked like it was fairly good.”

The first harvest of hay is in, but the second harvest may be affected by the flooding, which in turn may affect farm animals.

“A lot of the hay has already been cut, but I don’t know about the second crop,” she said. “It’s going to be difficult with all the wet weather for them to get it harvested. Some of it that wasn’t cut, is in real bad shape, because it’s not really good hay. It’s past its prime. Once it gets pasts its prime, the food value goes down each day.

“If the hay is still in the field, it’s not going to have very good food value for livestock,” she added.

Sedalia Democrat
comments powered by Disqus