Native American culture celebrated at Pow Wow


Hannah Greenfeather Harms, 16, of Cole Camp, dances in the Intertribal Dance Saturday afternoon at the 26th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Harms, who is of the “Shawnee Tribe but adopted by the Cherokee,” said she is Princess for Life of the Osage River Pow Wow in Eldon. Her jingle dress made with 365 cones representing each day of the year, is used in healing dances. Harms’s grandmother, Margo Holtzen, of Cole Camp, made the dress.


Faith Bemiss | Democrat

During the Intertribal Dance at Saturday’s Memorial Pow Wow, Brian Whitaker, right, of Whiteman Air Force Base, dances in grass dancer regalia that represents the Omaha Tribe. Whitaker said his foster parents are from the Kiowa and Seneca tribes. The Pow Wow is hosted each year inside the Agriculture Building on the fairgrounds.


Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Lila Ritcheson, left, 10, of Cole Camp, wanted to learn how to dance at the Memorial Pow Wow on Saturday and Zoe Marion, of Brumely, helped her during the Intertribal Dance. Ritcheson was attending the Pow Wow with her grandmother Linda Cramer of Sedalia, who said she comes from the Choctaw Tribe. Brumely, who is Chickasaw by blood but follows Lakota traditions, said she tried to attend as many Pow Wows as possible. This is her third Pow Wow this year.


Faith Bemiss | Democrat

A young boy dances Saturday afternoon in the Intertribal Dance during the annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow. A Gourd Dance, to honor all veterans, was hosted earlier in the day with the Grand Entry planned for 7 p.m.


Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Dancers dance in the sacred circle during the colorful Intertribal Dance, Saturday afternoon, at the 26th annual Memorial Pow Wow. The event opened Friday and ran through Sunday and is sponsored by the American Council for Cultural Awareness.


Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Hannah Greenfeather Harms, 16, of Cole Camp, dances in the Intertribal Dance Saturday afternoon at the 26th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Harms, who is of the “Shawnee Tribe but adopted by the Cherokee,” said she is Princess for Life of the Osage River Pow Wow in Eldon. Her jingle dress made with 365 cones representing each day of the year, is used in healing dances. Harms’s grandmother, Margo Holtzen, of Cole Camp, made the dress.

During the Intertribal Dance at Saturday’s Memorial Pow Wow, Brian Whitaker, right, of Whiteman Air Force Base, dances in grass dancer regalia that represents the Omaha Tribe. Whitaker said his foster parents are from the Kiowa and Seneca tribes. The Pow Wow is hosted each year inside the Agriculture Building on the fairgrounds.

Lila Ritcheson, left, 10, of Cole Camp, wanted to learn how to dance at the Memorial Pow Wow on Saturday and Zoe Marion, of Brumely, helped her during the Intertribal Dance. Ritcheson was attending the Pow Wow with her grandmother Linda Cramer of Sedalia, who said she comes from the Choctaw Tribe. Brumely, who is Chickasaw by blood but follows Lakota traditions, said she tried to attend as many Pow Wows as possible. This is her third Pow Wow this year.

A young boy dances Saturday afternoon in the Intertribal Dance during the annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow. A Gourd Dance, to honor all veterans, was hosted earlier in the day with the Grand Entry planned for 7 p.m.

Dancers dance in the sacred circle during the colorful Intertribal Dance, Saturday afternoon, at the 26th annual Memorial Pow Wow. The event opened Friday and ran through Sunday and is sponsored by the American Council for Cultural Awareness.

Hannah Greenfeather Harms, 16, of Cole Camp, dances in the Intertribal Dance Saturday afternoon at the 26th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Harms, who is of the “Shawnee Tribe but adopted by the Cherokee,” said she is Princess for Life of the Osage River Pow Wow in Eldon. Her jingle dress made with 365 cones representing each day of the year, is used in healing dances. Harms’s grandmother, Margo Holtzen, of Cole Camp, made the dress.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_TSD071816PowWow-1.jpgHannah Greenfeather Harms, 16, of Cole Camp, dances in the Intertribal Dance Saturday afternoon at the 26th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Harms, who is of the “Shawnee Tribe but adopted by the Cherokee,” said she is Princess for Life of the Osage River Pow Wow in Eldon. Her jingle dress made with 365 cones representing each day of the year, is used in healing dances. Harms’s grandmother, Margo Holtzen, of Cole Camp, made the dress. Faith Bemiss | Democrat

During the Intertribal Dance at Saturday’s Memorial Pow Wow, Brian Whitaker, right, of Whiteman Air Force Base, dances in grass dancer regalia that represents the Omaha Tribe. Whitaker said his foster parents are from the Kiowa and Seneca tribes. The Pow Wow is hosted each year inside the Agriculture Building on the fairgrounds.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_TSD071816PowWow-2.jpgDuring the Intertribal Dance at Saturday’s Memorial Pow Wow, Brian Whitaker, right, of Whiteman Air Force Base, dances in grass dancer regalia that represents the Omaha Tribe. Whitaker said his foster parents are from the Kiowa and Seneca tribes. The Pow Wow is hosted each year inside the Agriculture Building on the fairgrounds. Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Lila Ritcheson, left, 10, of Cole Camp, wanted to learn how to dance at the Memorial Pow Wow on Saturday and Zoe Marion, of Brumely, helped her during the Intertribal Dance. Ritcheson was attending the Pow Wow with her grandmother Linda Cramer of Sedalia, who said she comes from the Choctaw Tribe. Brumely, who is Chickasaw by blood but follows Lakota traditions, said she tried to attend as many Pow Wows as possible. This is her third Pow Wow this year.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_TSD071816PowWow-3.jpgLila Ritcheson, left, 10, of Cole Camp, wanted to learn how to dance at the Memorial Pow Wow on Saturday and Zoe Marion, of Brumely, helped her during the Intertribal Dance. Ritcheson was attending the Pow Wow with her grandmother Linda Cramer of Sedalia, who said she comes from the Choctaw Tribe. Brumely, who is Chickasaw by blood but follows Lakota traditions, said she tried to attend as many Pow Wows as possible. This is her third Pow Wow this year. Faith Bemiss | Democrat

A young boy dances Saturday afternoon in the Intertribal Dance during the annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow. A Gourd Dance, to honor all veterans, was hosted earlier in the day with the Grand Entry planned for 7 p.m.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_TSD071816PowWow-4.jpgA young boy dances Saturday afternoon in the Intertribal Dance during the annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow. A Gourd Dance, to honor all veterans, was hosted earlier in the day with the Grand Entry planned for 7 p.m. Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Dancers dance in the sacred circle during the colorful Intertribal Dance, Saturday afternoon, at the 26th annual Memorial Pow Wow. The event opened Friday and ran through Sunday and is sponsored by the American Council for Cultural Awareness.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_TSD071816PowWow-5.jpgDancers dance in the sacred circle during the colorful Intertribal Dance, Saturday afternoon, at the 26th annual Memorial Pow Wow. The event opened Friday and ran through Sunday and is sponsored by the American Council for Cultural Awareness. Faith Bemiss | Democrat
Sedalia Democrat
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