Vendors set up for annual Pow Wow


Several vendors began sitting up for the 25th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow Thursday that will be hosted today, Saturday and Sunday in the Ag Building on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Travis Gilstrap, of Crocker, was busy setting out some jewelry plus his handmade stone blade knives, tomahawks, and bookends. “We go out and find the rock and cut the rock and make it into something,” he said. Gilstrap travels with his wife Dorothy to Arizona, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado to find agate, jasper, moss agate and serpentine for his projects.


Beth Peeler, of Hunstville, and her friend Robin Raymond, of Columbia, had several tables outside they were prepping for the annual Pow Wow event. Peeler, who sells table runners, blankets, pottery and jewelry, said they would be attending all three days. “We’ll be the last one out here Sunday night,” she added.


At Travis Gilstrap’s table, an assortment of stone blade knives rest on wooden stands. Gilstrap and his wife Dorothy have attended the annual Pow Wow before, as vendors, and most recently attended Trail’s End Western Heritage Days hosted on the fairgrounds in April. “You have to do something when you have a hobby like this,” his wife said. “He’s a talented man.”


Outside on the south side of the Ag Building, Diane Johnson and her husband Kevin Thon, of Farmington, were almost done placing their items on their tables Thursday. The couple owns the business titled Good Trade and brought furs, leather bags, leather goods and bead work to sell at the Pow Wow. Johnson said she is from the Blackfeet Tribe; she and her husband added that it was tradition for her people to trap small animals with deadfalls and snares.


Several vendors began sitting up for the 25th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow Thursday that will be hosted today, Saturday and Sunday in the Ag Building on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Travis Gilstrap, of Crocker, was busy setting out some jewelry plus his handmade stone blade knives, tomahawks, and bookends. “We go out and find the rock and cut the rock and make it into something,” he said. Gilstrap travels with his wife Dorothy to Arizona, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado to find agate, jasper, moss agate and serpentine for his projects.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD071715PowWow-13.jpgSeveral vendors began sitting up for the 25th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow Thursday that will be hosted today, Saturday and Sunday in the Ag Building on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Travis Gilstrap, of Crocker, was busy setting out some jewelry plus his handmade stone blade knives, tomahawks, and bookends. “We go out and find the rock and cut the rock and make it into something,” he said. Gilstrap travels with his wife Dorothy to Arizona, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado to find agate, jasper, moss agate and serpentine for his projects.

Beth Peeler, of Hunstville, and her friend Robin Raymond, of Columbia, had several tables outside they were prepping for the annual Pow Wow event. Peeler, who sells table runners, blankets, pottery and jewelry, said they would be attending all three days. “We’ll be the last one out here Sunday night,” she added.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD071715PowWow-23.jpgBeth Peeler, of Hunstville, and her friend Robin Raymond, of Columbia, had several tables outside they were prepping for the annual Pow Wow event. Peeler, who sells table runners, blankets, pottery and jewelry, said they would be attending all three days. “We’ll be the last one out here Sunday night,” she added.

At Travis Gilstrap’s table, an assortment of stone blade knives rest on wooden stands. Gilstrap and his wife Dorothy have attended the annual Pow Wow before, as vendors, and most recently attended Trail’s End Western Heritage Days hosted on the fairgrounds in April. “You have to do something when you have a hobby like this,” his wife said. “He’s a talented man.”
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD071715PowWow-33.jpgAt Travis Gilstrap’s table, an assortment of stone blade knives rest on wooden stands. Gilstrap and his wife Dorothy have attended the annual Pow Wow before, as vendors, and most recently attended Trail’s End Western Heritage Days hosted on the fairgrounds in April. “You have to do something when you have a hobby like this,” his wife said. “He’s a talented man.”

Outside on the south side of the Ag Building, Diane Johnson and her husband Kevin Thon, of Farmington, were almost done placing their items on their tables Thursday. The couple owns the business titled Good Trade and brought furs, leather bags, leather goods and bead work to sell at the Pow Wow. Johnson said she is from the Blackfeet Tribe; she and her husband added that it was tradition for her people to trap small animals with deadfalls and snares.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_TSD071715PowWow-43.jpgOutside on the south side of the Ag Building, Diane Johnson and her husband Kevin Thon, of Farmington, were almost done placing their items on their tables Thursday. The couple owns the business titled Good Trade and brought furs, leather bags, leather goods and bead work to sell at the Pow Wow. Johnson said she is from the Blackfeet Tribe; she and her husband added that it was tradition for her people to trap small animals with deadfalls and snares.

Several vendors began sitting up for the 25th annual Robert Woolery Sr. Memorial Pow Wow Thursday that will be hosted today, Saturday and Sunday in the Ag Building on the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Travis Gilstrap, of Crocker, was busy setting out some jewelry plus his handmade stone blade knives, tomahawks, and bookends. “We go out and find the rock and cut the rock and make it into something,” he said. Gilstrap travels with his wife Dorothy to Arizona, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado to find agate, jasper, moss agate and serpentine for his projects.

Beth Peeler, of Hunstville, and her friend Robin Raymond, of Columbia, had several tables outside they were prepping for the annual Pow Wow event. Peeler, who sells table runners, blankets, pottery and jewelry, said they would be attending all three days. “We’ll be the last one out here Sunday night,” she added.

At Travis Gilstrap’s table, an assortment of stone blade knives rest on wooden stands. Gilstrap and his wife Dorothy have attended the annual Pow Wow before, as vendors, and most recently attended Trail’s End Western Heritage Days hosted on the fairgrounds in April. “You have to do something when you have a hobby like this,” his wife said. “He’s a talented man.”

Outside on the south side of the Ag Building, Diane Johnson and her husband Kevin Thon, of Farmington, were almost done placing their items on their tables Thursday. The couple owns the business titled Good Trade and brought furs, leather bags, leather goods and bead work to sell at the Pow Wow. Johnson said she is from the Blackfeet Tribe; she and her husband added that it was tradition for her people to trap small animals with deadfalls and snares.

Sedalia Democrat
comments powered by Disqus