Trail’s End time capsule laid to rest


About 30 people attended the Trail’s End Time Capsule Dedication at 4 p.m. Thursday at Starline Brass Plaza on the northeast corner of the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Dr. Douglas Kiburz, left, a Trail’s End Committee board member, gave the keynote address. “A time capsule is like an old cowboy’s grave,” he said. “Some words ought to be said.”


Listening as Kiburz spoke were Trail’s End Committee members Gerry Wolf, top left, and Jack Slocum, Vernon Dougan, bottom left, Liz and Dale Yelton, board co-chairs, and Sharon Kearney, Trail’s End secretary. Kiburz said the time capsule included sheet music from Scott Joplin, and a Sedalia song that hadn’t been sung for 50 years. The capsule also contains music Billboard’s Top 100 songs, a Farmers’ Almanac, and a series of Sedalia Democrat papers dating from 1860 to 1960, and much more material.


Trail’s End Committee Co-Chair Liz Yelton throws dirt on top of the med-sized burial vault/time capsule after it was lowered in the ground. The vault was donated by Larry and Kelly Zimmerschied of Saline Vault in Sweet Springs. Donna Plummer, Matthew Gardener, David Gustin, all funeral directors at McLaughlin Funeral Home, and Jason Weiker, owner, worked together to place the items in the vault and seal it up for safe keeping.


Dr. Douglas Kiburz said the capsule is a “leap-frog” time capsule. It will be opened at 50 years and 100 years and the contents reevaluated. The capsule is also registered with the International Time Capsule Registrar in Atlanta, Georgia. “We commemorate the pioneers, the railroad men, the cattlemen that came before us, who gave their lives for future generations; we are that future generation,” he added.


About 30 people attended the Trail’s End Time Capsule Dedication at 4 p.m. Thursday at Starline Brass Plaza on the northeast corner of the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Dr. Douglas Kiburz, left, a Trail’s End Committee board member, gave the keynote address. “A time capsule is like an old cowboy’s grave,” he said. “Some words ought to be said.”
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_TSD081415TrailsEnd-1.jpgAbout 30 people attended the Trail’s End Time Capsule Dedication at 4 p.m. Thursday at Starline Brass Plaza on the northeast corner of the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Dr. Douglas Kiburz, left, a Trail’s End Committee board member, gave the keynote address. “A time capsule is like an old cowboy’s grave,” he said. “Some words ought to be said.”

Listening as Kiburz spoke were Trail’s End Committee members Gerry Wolf, top left, and Jack Slocum, Vernon Dougan, bottom left, Liz and Dale Yelton, board co-chairs, and Sharon Kearney, Trail’s End secretary. Kiburz said the time capsule included sheet music from Scott Joplin, and a Sedalia song that hadn’t been sung for 50 years. The capsule also contains music Billboard’s Top 100 songs, a Farmers’ Almanac, and a series of Sedalia Democrat papers dating from 1860 to 1960, and much more material.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_TSD081415TrailsEnd-2.jpgListening as Kiburz spoke were Trail’s End Committee members Gerry Wolf, top left, and Jack Slocum, Vernon Dougan, bottom left, Liz and Dale Yelton, board co-chairs, and Sharon Kearney, Trail’s End secretary. Kiburz said the time capsule included sheet music from Scott Joplin, and a Sedalia song that hadn’t been sung for 50 years. The capsule also contains music Billboard’s Top 100 songs, a Farmers’ Almanac, and a series of Sedalia Democrat papers dating from 1860 to 1960, and much more material.

Trail’s End Committee Co-Chair Liz Yelton throws dirt on top of the med-sized burial vault/time capsule after it was lowered in the ground. The vault was donated by Larry and Kelly Zimmerschied of Saline Vault in Sweet Springs. Donna Plummer, Matthew Gardener, David Gustin, all funeral directors at McLaughlin Funeral Home, and Jason Weiker, owner, worked together to place the items in the vault and seal it up for safe keeping.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_TSD081415TrailsEnd-3.jpgTrail’s End Committee Co-Chair Liz Yelton throws dirt on top of the med-sized burial vault/time capsule after it was lowered in the ground. The vault was donated by Larry and Kelly Zimmerschied of Saline Vault in Sweet Springs. Donna Plummer, Matthew Gardener, David Gustin, all funeral directors at McLaughlin Funeral Home, and Jason Weiker, owner, worked together to place the items in the vault and seal it up for safe keeping.

Dr. Douglas Kiburz said the capsule is a “leap-frog” time capsule. It will be opened at 50 years and 100 years and the contents reevaluated. The capsule is also registered with the International Time Capsule Registrar in Atlanta, Georgia. “We commemorate the pioneers, the railroad men, the cattlemen that came before us, who gave their lives for future generations; we are that future generation,” he added.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_TSD081415TrailsEnd-4.jpgDr. Douglas Kiburz said the capsule is a “leap-frog” time capsule. It will be opened at 50 years and 100 years and the contents reevaluated. The capsule is also registered with the International Time Capsule Registrar in Atlanta, Georgia. “We commemorate the pioneers, the railroad men, the cattlemen that came before us, who gave their lives for future generations; we are that future generation,” he added.

About 30 people attended the Trail’s End Time Capsule Dedication at 4 p.m. Thursday at Starline Brass Plaza on the northeast corner of the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Dr. Douglas Kiburz, left, a Trail’s End Committee board member, gave the keynote address. “A time capsule is like an old cowboy’s grave,” he said. “Some words ought to be said.”

Listening as Kiburz spoke were Trail’s End Committee members Gerry Wolf, top left, and Jack Slocum, Vernon Dougan, bottom left, Liz and Dale Yelton, board co-chairs, and Sharon Kearney, Trail’s End secretary. Kiburz said the time capsule included sheet music from Scott Joplin, and a Sedalia song that hadn’t been sung for 50 years. The capsule also contains music Billboard’s Top 100 songs, a Farmers’ Almanac, and a series of Sedalia Democrat papers dating from 1860 to 1960, and much more material.

Trail’s End Committee Co-Chair Liz Yelton throws dirt on top of the med-sized burial vault/time capsule after it was lowered in the ground. The vault was donated by Larry and Kelly Zimmerschied of Saline Vault in Sweet Springs. Donna Plummer, Matthew Gardener, David Gustin, all funeral directors at McLaughlin Funeral Home, and Jason Weiker, owner, worked together to place the items in the vault and seal it up for safe keeping.

Dr. Douglas Kiburz said the capsule is a “leap-frog” time capsule. It will be opened at 50 years and 100 years and the contents reevaluated. The capsule is also registered with the International Time Capsule Registrar in Atlanta, Georgia. “We commemorate the pioneers, the railroad men, the cattlemen that came before us, who gave their lives for future generations; we are that future generation,” he added.

Sedalia Democrat
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