Liberty Park gardens a buzzy place


A Snowberry clearwing, a type of hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a small flower at Liberty Park Thursday afternoon. The small, day-flying moths look and move like a hummingbird. Although human visitors were sparse at the park, butterflies and other flying insects were busy in the late summer gardens.


A Monarch butterfly drinks nectar from a zinnia flower at Liberty Park. Monarch migration usually begins in October each year, with the butterflies winging their way to locations in Mexico for overwintering.


Not fazed by the 96 degree temperatures Thursday, a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly finds a perfect flower for sipping nectar. According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Pipevine swallowtail’s orange spots are used as a warning to predators that the butterfly is distasteful and bitter.


A Snowberry clearwing, a type of hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a small flower at Liberty Park Thursday afternoon. The small, day-flying moths look and move like a hummingbird. Although human visitors were sparse at the park, butterflies and other flying insects were busy in the late summer gardens.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD090415Butterflies-1.jpgA Snowberry clearwing, a type of hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a small flower at Liberty Park Thursday afternoon. The small, day-flying moths look and move like a hummingbird. Although human visitors were sparse at the park, butterflies and other flying insects were busy in the late summer gardens.

A Monarch butterfly drinks nectar from a zinnia flower at Liberty Park. Monarch migration usually begins in October each year, with the butterflies winging their way to locations in Mexico for overwintering.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD090415Butterflies-2.jpgA Monarch butterfly drinks nectar from a zinnia flower at Liberty Park. Monarch migration usually begins in October each year, with the butterflies winging their way to locations in Mexico for overwintering.

Not fazed by the 96 degree temperatures Thursday, a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly finds a perfect flower for sipping nectar. According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Pipevine swallowtail’s orange spots are used as a warning to predators that the butterfly is distasteful and bitter.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD090415Butterflies-3.jpgNot fazed by the 96 degree temperatures Thursday, a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly finds a perfect flower for sipping nectar. According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Pipevine swallowtail’s orange spots are used as a warning to predators that the butterfly is distasteful and bitter.

A Snowberry clearwing, a type of hummingbird moth, sips nectar from a small flower at Liberty Park Thursday afternoon. The small, day-flying moths look and move like a hummingbird. Although human visitors were sparse at the park, butterflies and other flying insects were busy in the late summer gardens.

A Monarch butterfly drinks nectar from a zinnia flower at Liberty Park. Monarch migration usually begins in October each year, with the butterflies winging their way to locations in Mexico for overwintering.

Not fazed by the 96 degree temperatures Thursday, a Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly finds a perfect flower for sipping nectar. According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Pipevine swallowtail’s orange spots are used as a warning to predators that the butterfly is distasteful and bitter.

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Sedalia Democrat

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

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