Cole Camp fluffs all summer for fair floats


Residents of Cole Camp have worked for months creating paper flower covered floats for the 99th Annual Cole Camp Fair that began Thursday. The fruits of their labor were evident on Sept. 2 with a float created by members of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. The church’s fair themed float featured a world-globe created with piping, and fluffed paper flower fruits and vegetables representing fair entries. The float also included a tractor, a turtle, a cow and a patriotic banner.


On July 30, Sara Harms, an eighth grader, works on a float for the Lutheran School Association. The group, including members of Partners in Education (PIE), decided to work with a Minion theme said Sara’s mother, Christel Harms. She added that by the end of July they had created 13,400 paper flowers for their float and expecting to make 18,000 all total. They were planning to construct eight Minions.


Taking shape fast, flowers created by members of Cole Camp’s First United Methodist Church grace their float on Sept. 2. In July, Jim Hickman, Leonard Creek and Kurt Borgemeyer worked to assemble the wood frame the float would rest on inside the Benton County Maintenance Shed on state Route 52.


Natalie Paxton, a member of the First UMC in Cole Camp, works to affix paper flowers on the group’s float Sept. 2. She said the theme for their float was “Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors.” Paxton said the church makes a float every-other year for the fair, and added that approximately 15 to 20 people worked on the project. “And, a lot of people take home flowers,” she said.


The Senior Class at Cole Camp High School were well on their way to completing their float Sept. 2. The class settled on a Scooby-Doo theme and used a Tracker frame to assemble a Mystery Machine “van.” Thaney Brockman said CCHS senior Jill Farmer had created much of the art work for the project. The float, that was expected to have 35,000 flowers, was created by the senior class, parents and “dads who did the framing and mechanical” work Brockman added.


CCHS Seniors Gabbi Mallard, left, and Meghan Horner work with Elizabeth Craig (not pictured) on their float July 30 in the school’s weight and conditioning room. During the summer the group spent eight to 10 hours a week making their float. When school started they worked from 3 to 9 p.m. each day and still had 30 hours of work, on Sept. 2, to finish the project.


Residents of Cole Camp have worked for months creating paper flower covered floats for the 99th Annual Cole Camp Fair that began Thursday. The fruits of their labor were evident on Sept. 2 with a float created by members of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. The church’s fair themed float featured a world-globe created with piping, and fluffed paper flower fruits and vegetables representing fair entries. The float also included a tractor, a turtle, a cow and a patriotic banner.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091215FloatPhotos-11.jpgResidents of Cole Camp have worked for months creating paper flower covered floats for the 99th Annual Cole Camp Fair that began Thursday. The fruits of their labor were evident on Sept. 2 with a float created by members of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. The church’s fair themed float featured a world-globe created with piping, and fluffed paper flower fruits and vegetables representing fair entries. The float also included a tractor, a turtle, a cow and a patriotic banner.

On July 30, Sara Harms, an eighth grader, works on a float for the Lutheran School Association. The group, including members of Partners in Education (PIE), decided to work with a Minion theme said Sara’s mother, Christel Harms. She added that by the end of July they had created 13,400 paper flowers for their float and expecting to make 18,000 all total. They were planning to construct eight Minions.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091215FloatPhotos-21.jpgOn July 30, Sara Harms, an eighth grader, works on a float for the Lutheran School Association. The group, including members of Partners in Education (PIE), decided to work with a Minion theme said Sara’s mother, Christel Harms. She added that by the end of July they had created 13,400 paper flowers for their float and expecting to make 18,000 all total. They were planning to construct eight Minions.

Taking shape fast, flowers created by members of Cole Camp’s First United Methodist Church grace their float on Sept. 2. In July, Jim Hickman, Leonard Creek and Kurt Borgemeyer worked to assemble the wood frame the float would rest on inside the Benton County Maintenance Shed on state Route 52.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091215Floatphotos-31.jpgTaking shape fast, flowers created by members of Cole Camp’s First United Methodist Church grace their float on Sept. 2. In July, Jim Hickman, Leonard Creek and Kurt Borgemeyer worked to assemble the wood frame the float would rest on inside the Benton County Maintenance Shed on state Route 52.

Natalie Paxton, a member of the First UMC in Cole Camp, works to affix paper flowers on the group’s float Sept. 2. She said the theme for their float was “Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors.” Paxton said the church makes a float every-other year for the fair, and added that approximately 15 to 20 people worked on the project. “And, a lot of people take home flowers,” she said.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091215FloatPhotos-41.jpgNatalie Paxton, a member of the First UMC in Cole Camp, works to affix paper flowers on the group’s float Sept. 2. She said the theme for their float was “Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors.” Paxton said the church makes a float every-other year for the fair, and added that approximately 15 to 20 people worked on the project. “And, a lot of people take home flowers,” she said.

The Senior Class at Cole Camp High School were well on their way to completing their float Sept. 2. The class settled on a Scooby-Doo theme and used a Tracker frame to assemble a Mystery Machine “van.” Thaney Brockman said CCHS senior Jill Farmer had created much of the art work for the project. The float, that was expected to have 35,000 flowers, was created by the senior class, parents and “dads who did the framing and mechanical” work Brockman added.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091215FloatPhotos-51.jpgThe Senior Class at Cole Camp High School were well on their way to completing their float Sept. 2. The class settled on a Scooby-Doo theme and used a Tracker frame to assemble a Mystery Machine “van.” Thaney Brockman said CCHS senior Jill Farmer had created much of the art work for the project. The float, that was expected to have 35,000 flowers, was created by the senior class, parents and “dads who did the framing and mechanical” work Brockman added.

CCHS Seniors Gabbi Mallard, left, and Meghan Horner work with Elizabeth Craig (not pictured) on their float July 30 in the school’s weight and conditioning room. During the summer the group spent eight to 10 hours a week making their float. When school started they worked from 3 to 9 p.m. each day and still had 30 hours of work, on Sept. 2, to finish the project.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091215FloatPhotos-61.jpgCCHS Seniors Gabbi Mallard, left, and Meghan Horner work with Elizabeth Craig (not pictured) on their float July 30 in the school’s weight and conditioning room. During the summer the group spent eight to 10 hours a week making their float. When school started they worked from 3 to 9 p.m. each day and still had 30 hours of work, on Sept. 2, to finish the project.

Residents of Cole Camp have worked for months creating paper flower covered floats for the 99th Annual Cole Camp Fair that began Thursday. The fruits of their labor were evident on Sept. 2 with a float created by members of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. The church’s fair themed float featured a world-globe created with piping, and fluffed paper flower fruits and vegetables representing fair entries. The float also included a tractor, a turtle, a cow and a patriotic banner.

On July 30, Sara Harms, an eighth grader, works on a float for the Lutheran School Association. The group, including members of Partners in Education (PIE), decided to work with a Minion theme said Sara’s mother, Christel Harms. She added that by the end of July they had created 13,400 paper flowers for their float and expecting to make 18,000 all total. They were planning to construct eight Minions.

Taking shape fast, flowers created by members of Cole Camp’s First United Methodist Church grace their float on Sept. 2. In July, Jim Hickman, Leonard Creek and Kurt Borgemeyer worked to assemble the wood frame the float would rest on inside the Benton County Maintenance Shed on state Route 52.

Natalie Paxton, a member of the First UMC in Cole Camp, works to affix paper flowers on the group’s float Sept. 2. She said the theme for their float was “Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors.” Paxton said the church makes a float every-other year for the fair, and added that approximately 15 to 20 people worked on the project. “And, a lot of people take home flowers,” she said.

The Senior Class at Cole Camp High School were well on their way to completing their float Sept. 2. The class settled on a Scooby-Doo theme and used a Tracker frame to assemble a Mystery Machine “van.” Thaney Brockman said CCHS senior Jill Farmer had created much of the art work for the project. The float, that was expected to have 35,000 flowers, was created by the senior class, parents and “dads who did the framing and mechanical” work Brockman added.

CCHS Seniors Gabbi Mallard, left, and Meghan Horner work with Elizabeth Craig (not pictured) on their float July 30 in the school’s weight and conditioning room. During the summer the group spent eight to 10 hours a week making their float. When school started they worked from 3 to 9 p.m. each day and still had 30 hours of work, on Sept. 2, to finish the project.

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Sedalia Democrat

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

comments powered by Disqus