Young artists strive to capture images in nature


By Hope Lecchi - [email protected]



Malaki Downey, a seventh grade student from Cole Camp, works on the perspective of the roof in his colored pencil drawing at the Kaysinger Conference Junior High Art Show hosted Thursday morning at the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Downey said he liked to spend his free time drawing.


Cameron Whisler, left, and Gavin Ichrist, best friends from Tipton, work on their drawings. The two boys found a quiet spot in the Highway Gardens to capture the landscape. Whisler was using colored pencils to draw a lamp post and arbor. Ichrist choose pencil as his medium while he worked on drawing the image of an Oak tree.


Makayla Williams, from Tipton, works with watercolor as she paints a picture of a tree. Williams said she was asked to come by her teacher and hoped she can compete again next year as an eighth grader.


Joshua Townsend, from Northwest High School, sits quietly while he draws a streetscape with shading pencils. He said he chose the spot because he liked the building, the street and the trees, and hoped to capture all of them in his work.


Maria Mergen, from Sacred Heart School, paints the center of her sunflower with watercolors at the Kaysinger Junior High Art Competition Thursday morning. Students were given two hours to find a location on the Missouri State Fairgrounds and create a piece of art. Mergen said she felt it was an honor to be chosen to compete at the event.


Adrian Chinn’s hands show the efforts of her work at the Kaysinger Junior High Conference Art Show. After drawing for an hour with charcoal, Chinn’s hands were covered with lead. An eighth grader from Stover, this was her first year to compete in the event.


By Hope Lecchi

[email protected]

Malaki Downey, a seventh grade student from Cole Camp, works on the perspective of the roof in his colored pencil drawing at the Kaysinger Conference Junior High Art Show hosted Thursday morning at the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Downey said he liked to spend his free time drawing.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_tsd091815artcontest1.jpgMalaki Downey, a seventh grade student from Cole Camp, works on the perspective of the roof in his colored pencil drawing at the Kaysinger Conference Junior High Art Show hosted Thursday morning at the Missouri State Fairgrounds. Downey said he liked to spend his free time drawing.

Cameron Whisler, left, and Gavin Ichrist, best friends from Tipton, work on their drawings. The two boys found a quiet spot in the Highway Gardens to capture the landscape. Whisler was using colored pencils to draw a lamp post and arbor. Ichrist choose pencil as his medium while he worked on drawing the image of an Oak tree.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_tsd091815artcontest2.jpgCameron Whisler, left, and Gavin Ichrist, best friends from Tipton, work on their drawings. The two boys found a quiet spot in the Highway Gardens to capture the landscape. Whisler was using colored pencils to draw a lamp post and arbor. Ichrist choose pencil as his medium while he worked on drawing the image of an Oak tree.

Makayla Williams, from Tipton, works with watercolor as she paints a picture of a tree. Williams said she was asked to come by her teacher and hoped she can compete again next year as an eighth grader.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_tsd091815artcontest3.jpgMakayla Williams, from Tipton, works with watercolor as she paints a picture of a tree. Williams said she was asked to come by her teacher and hoped she can compete again next year as an eighth grader.

Joshua Townsend, from Northwest High School, sits quietly while he draws a streetscape with shading pencils. He said he chose the spot because he liked the building, the street and the trees, and hoped to capture all of them in his work.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_tsd091815artcontest4.jpgJoshua Townsend, from Northwest High School, sits quietly while he draws a streetscape with shading pencils. He said he chose the spot because he liked the building, the street and the trees, and hoped to capture all of them in his work.

Maria Mergen, from Sacred Heart School, paints the center of her sunflower with watercolors at the Kaysinger Junior High Art Competition Thursday morning. Students were given two hours to find a location on the Missouri State Fairgrounds and create a piece of art. Mergen said she felt it was an honor to be chosen to compete at the event.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_tsd091815artcontest5.jpgMaria Mergen, from Sacred Heart School, paints the center of her sunflower with watercolors at the Kaysinger Junior High Art Competition Thursday morning. Students were given two hours to find a location on the Missouri State Fairgrounds and create a piece of art. Mergen said she felt it was an honor to be chosen to compete at the event.

Adrian Chinn’s hands show the efforts of her work at the Kaysinger Junior High Conference Art Show. After drawing for an hour with charcoal, Chinn’s hands were covered with lead. An eighth grader from Stover, this was her first year to compete in the event.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_tsd091815artcontest6.jpgAdrian Chinn’s hands show the efforts of her work at the Kaysinger Junior High Conference Art Show. After drawing for an hour with charcoal, Chinn’s hands were covered with lead. An eighth grader from Stover, this was her first year to compete in the event.

Some artists are capable of capturing an image with a few strokes of a pen or brush, for others they practice and hone their skills each day.

Both methods of talent were on display at the Kaysinger Junior High Art Contest hosted at the Missouri State Fairgrounds Thursday morning.

“It is a good experience for the students to have the opportunity to come out and draw from observation,” Lori Larimore, art instructor at Green Ridge, said. “It’s an opportunity for them to learn from others and even to be pushed a little bit by their peers.”

Sixteen students from each of the 11 conference schools were chosen to attend the event.

The students are given two hours to create a work using one of eight media: pen and ink, charcoal, markers, graphite pencils, watercolors, pastels, colored pencils or mixed media.

The students were allowed to select the image they wanted to capture on the Fairgrounds, and in some cases were allowed to choose the media they worked with.

Each school could have a maximum of two students per medium and most teachers said they allowed the students to choose what they worked with.

“We have an outstanding group of students once again,” Mary Kehl, art teacher at Sacred Heart School, said. “We have perfect weather this year and the kids are working really hard on their individual projects this morning.”

After completing their works and a break for lunch, the students met for a group activity competition.

“The students are given a small square with an image on it,” art instructor from Smithton Mel Mercer said. “We give them a bigger square of paper and ask them to replicate the image they have been given to the larger size.”

The larger squares are then connected together to recreate the original image.

The 16 students from each school work together as a team, with each student contributing a square.

“We judge them based on their accuracy, and speed and the work as a whole,” Mercer added. “It’s a way for them to compete together but still use their individual skills.”

Throughout the morning, students could be found in pairs and groups asking their friends, classmates and peers for a critique of their work.

With a two-hour time limit that included finding the location where they wanted to work, there was not a lot of time for talking as the young artists were focused on their work.

Best friends Cameron Whisler and Gavin Ichrist from Tipton were seated on the same bench, each concentrating while working on a landscape in the Highway Gardens.

“At first we were going someplace else, but it seemed like everybody else was going there,” Whisler said. “When I saw this, I thought of Narnia.”

“I liked the bush and the arbor, and besides that, the sun isn’t in our eyes,” Whisler added.

Whisler had his arm in a sling that he said made his work a little more difficult, but he made some accommodations to make his work easier.

“I’m lucky because I can draw with both hands,” he said. “That helped but we taped the paper down to my board before we came and that really helped too.”

As seventh graders, it was the first time the two boys could attend the competition but said they hoped to return next year.

Many of the teachers had different selection criteria for the students who attended. Some teachers asked for volunteers while others personally selected the students they brought to the event.

“I pick mine as a reward for the work they have done in class,” Anthony Mitchell II, of Stover, said. “They feel rewarded by the competition and want to learn.

“I don’t want them to not take this seriously,” he added. “For my students they think it is an honor to attend.”

Hope Lecchi can be reached at 660-826-1000 ext. 1484

Sedalia Democrat

Hope Lecchi can be reached at 660-826-1000 ext. 1484

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