‘Kindred Virtuosities’ opens at Daum Museum


Miki Baird, …having been there (detail), 2014, from the chronicles, shredded junk mail collected from the mailbox of one address, 48-by-288-inch. Courtesy of the artist and Haw Contemporary.


Garry Noland, Civilians, 2009-15, tape, cardboard; 90-by- 90-inches. Courtesy of Haw Contemporary.


Susan White, Dwelling, 2004, honey locust thorns 14-by-12-by-25-inches. Courtesy of the artist.


Miki Baird, …having been there (detail), 2014, from the chronicles, shredded junk mail collected from the mailbox of one address, 48-by-288-inch. Courtesy of the artist and Haw Contemporary.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091815DaumExhibit-1.jpgMiki Baird, …having been there (detail), 2014, from the chronicles, shredded junk mail collected from the mailbox of one address, 48-by-288-inch. Courtesy of the artist and Haw Contemporary.

Garry Noland, Civilians, 2009-15, tape, cardboard; 90-by- 90-inches. Courtesy of Haw Contemporary.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091815DaumExhibit-2.jpegGarry Noland, Civilians, 2009-15, tape, cardboard; 90-by- 90-inches. Courtesy of Haw Contemporary.

Susan White, Dwelling, 2004, honey locust thorns 14-by-12-by-25-inches. Courtesy of the artist.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD091815DaumExhibit-3.jpgSusan White, Dwelling, 2004, honey locust thorns 14-by-12-by-25-inches. Courtesy of the artist.

An exhibition of diverse artworks by three artists whose studios are located in Kansas City will open Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art on the State Fair Community College Sedalia campus. All exhibitions will remain on view through Dec. 22.

Although clearly individual, the exhibits in “Kindred Virtuosities: Recent Work by Miki Baird, Garry Noland and Susan White” share common characteristics that mark them as compatible and complementary explorations. Among their common strategies is the embrace of non-art materials and alternative processes and a facility for working in both two and three dimensions. Shared formal procedures include layering, systematic organization and mass replication.

Baird alternates between meticulously designed photographic assemblages of thousands of images and enormous accumulations of shredded junk mail, collected from the mailbox of one address. Both of her endeavors engage everyday phenomena by weaving together the designs and repetitions inherent in the quotidian.

Noland forges links between pattern, process and transformation. His large-scale duct-tape collages engage the vocabulary of vintage domesticity — peeling layers of aged wallpaper or linoleum flooring, say, or the controlled randomness of a crazy quilt. This embrace of the abject and found object continues in his series of Failed Monuments, where large nuggets of reclaimed dock foam are resuscitated by a partial gilding with golden adhesive tape.

White is engaged primarily with pyrography and “thorn works” — three-dimensional assemblages made from the thorns of the honey locust tree. Her pyrographs, large drawings on thick rag paper, are made with the use of a burning tool with which White creates drifting galaxies of many small marks that become poetic evocations of constellations or cells or prayer. Her thorn sculptures, in their accumulation, have a more architectural character, although the right-angle alignment of thorn to branch creates a cubistic tracery that relates as much to drawn lines as it does to constructed forms.

Artist-led gallery talks are planned at 6 p.m. Thursdays in October. Baird will speak Oct. 1 in the Freed Gallery; Noland will speak Oct. 15 in the Scott Gallery, and White will speak Oct. 29 in the Freed Gallery.

This exhibition is presented with funding from the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency. Additional support comes from Barbara Schrader, season underwriter; Joseph Fischer and Gloria Angel, exhibition sponsors; and Sylvia L. Thompson, exhibition sponsor. All programs are supported by State Fair Community College and the members of Daum Museum of Contemporary Art.

Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission is free. For more information, call 530-5888 or visit www.daummuseum.org.

Release courtesy of Daum Museum of Contemporary Art

Sedalia Democrat

Release courtesy of Daum Museum of Contemporary Art

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