Festival brings art downtown


The fifth annual Queen of the Prairies Festival of the Arts, in downtown Sedalia saw sunny skies and mild weather on Saturday. QPFA Traveling Docents, Arlene Walje, left, dressed as Iva Rice, and Vicki Mews, dressed as Lula Archias, stopped to look at hats, at the tent “Woollies by Charlie.” The women, were portraying historical Sedalians during the festival. Vendor Charlie O’Neill, of Lake Ozark, creates mittens, scarves and purses out of re-purposed wool.


During the QPFA Luke Belardo, 4, poses inside an inflatable art tube, for his mother Vanessa Belardo, of Sedalia. The inflatable sculpture, in Kid’s Alley at Fifth Street and Ohio Avenue, allowed children to go inside and draw; it was sponsored by the Sedalia Young Professionals.


Dyana and Tom Cunningham, of Sedalia look over the oil paintings of QPFA vendor Pamela Morris, also of Sedalia. Tom Cunningham said they wanted to see what the artists were doing and what was being offered at the festival. Approximately 36 vendors participated in the annual event.


QPFA vendors Ariana Martinez, left, and her mother Gaby Galvan were selling artistic pottery, from Mexico, made from paper mache and leather on Saturday.


Glass paper weights and marbles, created by glass artist Eric Brunson, of Millersburg, sparkles in the mid-day sun at the QPFA on Saturday. Brunson said he’d been creating glass art for 14 years.


On Saturday afternoon, Anna Schmitt, of Sedalia looks at handwoven rugs made by Kathleen Boswell, of Sedalia. The work was hanging on a loom made in 1850. “It just fascinates me,” Schmitt said. “I love handmade stuff.”


The fifth annual Queen of the Prairies Festival of the Arts, in downtown Sedalia saw sunny skies and mild weather on Saturday. QPFA Traveling Docents, Arlene Walje, left, dressed as Iva Rice, and Vicki Mews, dressed as Lula Archias, stopped to look at hats, at the tent “Woollies by Charlie.” The women, were portraying historical Sedalians during the festival. Vendor Charlie O’Neill, of Lake Ozark, creates mittens, scarves and purses out of re-purposed wool.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD092815QueenOfPrairies-1.jpgThe fifth annual Queen of the Prairies Festival of the Arts, in downtown Sedalia saw sunny skies and mild weather on Saturday. QPFA Traveling Docents, Arlene Walje, left, dressed as Iva Rice, and Vicki Mews, dressed as Lula Archias, stopped to look at hats, at the tent “Woollies by Charlie.” The women, were portraying historical Sedalians during the festival. Vendor Charlie O’Neill, of Lake Ozark, creates mittens, scarves and purses out of re-purposed wool.

During the QPFA Luke Belardo, 4, poses inside an inflatable art tube, for his mother Vanessa Belardo, of Sedalia. The inflatable sculpture, in Kid’s Alley at Fifth Street and Ohio Avenue, allowed children to go inside and draw; it was sponsored by the Sedalia Young Professionals.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD092815QueenOfPrairies-2.jpgDuring the QPFA Luke Belardo, 4, poses inside an inflatable art tube, for his mother Vanessa Belardo, of Sedalia. The inflatable sculpture, in Kid’s Alley at Fifth Street and Ohio Avenue, allowed children to go inside and draw; it was sponsored by the Sedalia Young Professionals.

Dyana and Tom Cunningham, of Sedalia look over the oil paintings of QPFA vendor Pamela Morris, also of Sedalia. Tom Cunningham said they wanted to see what the artists were doing and what was being offered at the festival. Approximately 36 vendors participated in the annual event.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD092815QueenOfPrairies-3.jpgDyana and Tom Cunningham, of Sedalia look over the oil paintings of QPFA vendor Pamela Morris, also of Sedalia. Tom Cunningham said they wanted to see what the artists were doing and what was being offered at the festival. Approximately 36 vendors participated in the annual event.

QPFA vendors Ariana Martinez, left, and her mother Gaby Galvan were selling artistic pottery, from Mexico, made from paper mache and leather on Saturday.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD092815QueenOfPrairies-4.jpgQPFA vendors Ariana Martinez, left, and her mother Gaby Galvan were selling artistic pottery, from Mexico, made from paper mache and leather on Saturday.

Glass paper weights and marbles, created by glass artist Eric Brunson, of Millersburg, sparkles in the mid-day sun at the QPFA on Saturday. Brunson said he’d been creating glass art for 14 years.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD092815QueenOfPrairies-5.jpgGlass paper weights and marbles, created by glass artist Eric Brunson, of Millersburg, sparkles in the mid-day sun at the QPFA on Saturday. Brunson said he’d been creating glass art for 14 years.

On Saturday afternoon, Anna Schmitt, of Sedalia looks at handwoven rugs made by Kathleen Boswell, of Sedalia. The work was hanging on a loom made in 1850. “It just fascinates me,” Schmitt said. “I love handmade stuff.”
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_TSD092815QueenofPrairies-6.jpgOn Saturday afternoon, Anna Schmitt, of Sedalia looks at handwoven rugs made by Kathleen Boswell, of Sedalia. The work was hanging on a loom made in 1850. “It just fascinates me,” Schmitt said. “I love handmade stuff.”

The fifth annual Queen of the Prairies Festival of the Arts, in downtown Sedalia saw sunny skies and mild weather on Saturday. QPFA Traveling Docents, Arlene Walje, left, dressed as Iva Rice, and Vicki Mews, dressed as Lula Archias, stopped to look at hats, at the tent “Woollies by Charlie.” The women, were portraying historical Sedalians during the festival. Vendor Charlie O’Neill, of Lake Ozark, creates mittens, scarves and purses out of re-purposed wool.

During the QPFA Luke Belardo, 4, poses inside an inflatable art tube, for his mother Vanessa Belardo, of Sedalia. The inflatable sculpture, in Kid’s Alley at Fifth Street and Ohio Avenue, allowed children to go inside and draw; it was sponsored by the Sedalia Young Professionals.

Dyana and Tom Cunningham, of Sedalia look over the oil paintings of QPFA vendor Pamela Morris, also of Sedalia. Tom Cunningham said they wanted to see what the artists were doing and what was being offered at the festival. Approximately 36 vendors participated in the annual event.

QPFA vendors Ariana Martinez, left, and her mother Gaby Galvan were selling artistic pottery, from Mexico, made from paper mache and leather on Saturday.

Glass paper weights and marbles, created by glass artist Eric Brunson, of Millersburg, sparkles in the mid-day sun at the QPFA on Saturday. Brunson said he’d been creating glass art for 14 years.

On Saturday afternoon, Anna Schmitt, of Sedalia looks at handwoven rugs made by Kathleen Boswell, of Sedalia. The work was hanging on a loom made in 1850. “It just fascinates me,” Schmitt said. “I love handmade stuff.”

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Sedalia Democrat

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

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