Alone again naturally


American Coot prepares for migration

With fall, avian migration is well on its way as a lone American Coot swims in a lake at Clover Dell Park Tuesday morning. Missouri Department of Conservation Wildlife Management Biologist Kent Korthas said the water bird was possibly a “rare summer nester.” He added that the American Coot usually tends to move further north in the summer to the wetlands of Iowa. “In the spring and fall you will catch them (moving through locally) in migration,” he noted.


“(Coots) are summer residents,” Korthas said. The American Coot will typically fly further south toward the gulf states to find food during winter. “They will leave completely once we ice up,” he added. The American Coot feeds in wetlands and shallow water areas, usually eating vegetation and small invertebrates. Although graceful on the water, Coots are clumsy flyers; they take off by running with their large feet on the water.


“This is a neat time of year,” Korthas said referring to migration. The American Coot isn’t the only type of bird migrating through Missouri during October. Korthas said besides waterfowl, songbirds, shorebirds and hawks will be flying through the local area this month.


American Coot prepares for migration

With fall, avian migration is well on its way as a lone American Coot swims in a lake at Clover Dell Park Tuesday morning. Missouri Department of Conservation Wildlife Management Biologist Kent Korthas said the water bird was possibly a “rare summer nester.” He added that the American Coot usually tends to move further north in the summer to the wetlands of Iowa. “In the spring and fall you will catch them (moving through locally) in migration,” he noted.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD100715AmericanCoot-1.jpgWith fall, avian migration is well on its way as a lone American Coot swims in a lake at Clover Dell Park Tuesday morning. Missouri Department of Conservation Wildlife Management Biologist Kent Korthas said the water bird was possibly a “rare summer nester.” He added that the American Coot usually tends to move further north in the summer to the wetlands of Iowa. “In the spring and fall you will catch them (moving through locally) in migration,” he noted.

“(Coots) are summer residents,” Korthas said. The American Coot will typically fly further south toward the gulf states to find food during winter. “They will leave completely once we ice up,” he added. The American Coot feeds in wetlands and shallow water areas, usually eating vegetation and small invertebrates. Although graceful on the water, Coots are clumsy flyers; they take off by running with their large feet on the water.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD100715AmericanCoot-2.jpg“(Coots) are summer residents,” Korthas said. The American Coot will typically fly further south toward the gulf states to find food during winter. “They will leave completely once we ice up,” he added. The American Coot feeds in wetlands and shallow water areas, usually eating vegetation and small invertebrates. Although graceful on the water, Coots are clumsy flyers; they take off by running with their large feet on the water.

“This is a neat time of year,” Korthas said referring to migration. The American Coot isn’t the only type of bird migrating through Missouri during October. Korthas said besides waterfowl, songbirds, shorebirds and hawks will be flying through the local area this month.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD101715AmericanCoot-3.jpg“This is a neat time of year,” Korthas said referring to migration. The American Coot isn’t the only type of bird migrating through Missouri during October. Korthas said besides waterfowl, songbirds, shorebirds and hawks will be flying through the local area this month.

With fall, avian migration is well on its way as a lone American Coot swims in a lake at Clover Dell Park Tuesday morning. Missouri Department of Conservation Wildlife Management Biologist Kent Korthas said the water bird was possibly a “rare summer nester.” He added that the American Coot usually tends to move further north in the summer to the wetlands of Iowa. “In the spring and fall you will catch them (moving through locally) in migration,” he noted.

“(Coots) are summer residents,” Korthas said. The American Coot will typically fly further south toward the gulf states to find food during winter. “They will leave completely once we ice up,” he added. The American Coot feeds in wetlands and shallow water areas, usually eating vegetation and small invertebrates. Although graceful on the water, Coots are clumsy flyers; they take off by running with their large feet on the water.

“This is a neat time of year,” Korthas said referring to migration. The American Coot isn’t the only type of bird migrating through Missouri during October. Korthas said besides waterfowl, songbirds, shorebirds and hawks will be flying through the local area this month.

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Sedalia Democrat

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

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