Create, explore and experiment


Blue Sky After-School kicks off

Children have the opportunity to create, explore and experiment at Blue Sky After-School, which began Tuesday afternoon upstairs at Convention Hall at Liberty Park. Krista Kempton encouraged students to play “instruments” made from pots, pans, bowls, spoons and waffle makers as she read the book “Drum City.” Nora Dahlman, center, leaps in the air with her pot-lid cymbals. Kempton’s class emphasizes music, step and stories.


During Kempton’s class, Ascher Callis plays a metal cylinder with a spoon. “It’s not about just making noise,” Kempton told the children. “When you use your instrument try to be creative and create a rhythm.”


After learning about stories and music, the children moved to Diane Burnett’s class where she explained how to make a monotype print. She told the children they shouldn’t worry about how their piece turns out because it should be a “happy surprise.” Blue Sky After-School is sponsored by the Cooney Endowment for the Arts. For more information call 826-6292.


Burnett helps Maggie VanLeer, right, with her monotype during Blue Sky After-School on Tuesday by using a brayer to roll washable tempera paint onto a plastic plate. Watching Burnett is Dylan Davis.


Nora Dahlman uses a paintbrush to apply designs in her paint while creating her monotype. After prepping their plastic clear plates, the children added paper, pressed it down and pulled the finished print off the plates. Blue Sky After School runs once a week on Tuesdays until Nov. 17.


Blue Sky After-School kicks off

Children have the opportunity to create, explore and experiment at Blue Sky After-School, which began Tuesday afternoon upstairs at Convention Hall at Liberty Park. Krista Kempton encouraged students to play “instruments” made from pots, pans, bowls, spoons and waffle makers as she read the book “Drum City.” Nora Dahlman, center, leaps in the air with her pot-lid cymbals. Kempton’s class emphasizes music, step and stories.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD101415BlueSky-1.jpgChildren have the opportunity to create, explore and experiment at Blue Sky After-School, which began Tuesday afternoon upstairs at Convention Hall at Liberty Park. Krista Kempton encouraged students to play “instruments” made from pots, pans, bowls, spoons and waffle makers as she read the book “Drum City.” Nora Dahlman, center, leaps in the air with her pot-lid cymbals. Kempton’s class emphasizes music, step and stories.

During Kempton’s class, Ascher Callis plays a metal cylinder with a spoon. “It’s not about just making noise,” Kempton told the children. “When you use your instrument try to be creative and create a rhythm.”
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD101415BlueSky-2.jpgDuring Kempton’s class, Ascher Callis plays a metal cylinder with a spoon. “It’s not about just making noise,” Kempton told the children. “When you use your instrument try to be creative and create a rhythm.”

After learning about stories and music, the children moved to Diane Burnett’s class where she explained how to make a monotype print. She told the children they shouldn’t worry about how their piece turns out because it should be a “happy surprise.” Blue Sky After-School is sponsored by the Cooney Endowment for the Arts. For more information call 826-6292.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD101415BlueSky-3.jpgAfter learning about stories and music, the children moved to Diane Burnett’s class where she explained how to make a monotype print. She told the children they shouldn’t worry about how their piece turns out because it should be a “happy surprise.” Blue Sky After-School is sponsored by the Cooney Endowment for the Arts. For more information call 826-6292.

Burnett helps Maggie VanLeer, right, with her monotype during Blue Sky After-School on Tuesday by using a brayer to roll washable tempera paint onto a plastic plate. Watching Burnett is Dylan Davis.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD101415BlueSky-4.jpgBurnett helps Maggie VanLeer, right, with her monotype during Blue Sky After-School on Tuesday by using a brayer to roll washable tempera paint onto a plastic plate. Watching Burnett is Dylan Davis.

Nora Dahlman uses a paintbrush to apply designs in her paint while creating her monotype. After prepping their plastic clear plates, the children added paper, pressed it down and pulled the finished print off the plates. Blue Sky After School runs once a week on Tuesdays until Nov. 17.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_TSD101415BlueSky-5.jpgNora Dahlman uses a paintbrush to apply designs in her paint while creating her monotype. After prepping their plastic clear plates, the children added paper, pressed it down and pulled the finished print off the plates. Blue Sky After School runs once a week on Tuesdays until Nov. 17.

Children have the opportunity to create, explore and experiment at Blue Sky After-School, which began Tuesday afternoon upstairs at Convention Hall at Liberty Park. Krista Kempton encouraged students to play “instruments” made from pots, pans, bowls, spoons and waffle makers as she read the book “Drum City.” Nora Dahlman, center, leaps in the air with her pot-lid cymbals. Kempton’s class emphasizes music, step and stories.

During Kempton’s class, Ascher Callis plays a metal cylinder with a spoon. “It’s not about just making noise,” Kempton told the children. “When you use your instrument try to be creative and create a rhythm.”

After learning about stories and music, the children moved to Diane Burnett’s class where she explained how to make a monotype print. She told the children they shouldn’t worry about how their piece turns out because it should be a “happy surprise.” Blue Sky After-School is sponsored by the Cooney Endowment for the Arts. For more information call 826-6292.

Burnett helps Maggie VanLeer, right, with her monotype during Blue Sky After-School on Tuesday by using a brayer to roll washable tempera paint onto a plastic plate. Watching Burnett is Dylan Davis.

Nora Dahlman uses a paintbrush to apply designs in her paint while creating her monotype. After prepping their plastic clear plates, the children added paper, pressed it down and pulled the finished print off the plates. Blue Sky After School runs once a week on Tuesdays until Nov. 17.

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

Sedalia Democrat

Photos by Faith Bemiss | Democrat

comments powered by Disqus