A school family serving others at Christmas


Horace Mann students work to benefit civic causes

By Hope Lecchi - [email protected]



Dr Todd Fraley, principal at Horace Mann Elementary, hangs on the wall of the gymnasium at the school Dec. 17. Fraley agreed to the task after his students collected 25,785 aluminum cans during a month long can drive. Throughout the fall, students at the school have completed numerous service learning projects to benefit area civic organizations.


Students from Horace Mann fill a truck with aluminum cans in the school’s parking lot. The money collected from the recycling of the cans was donated to the Salvation Army. Ditzfeld Transfer Inc. donated the use of a tractor trailer to the school to deliver the cans to the local recycling center.


Students from Bonnie Wolfe’s fourth grade class duct tape their principal, Dr. Todd Fraley, to the wall at Horace Mann Elementary on Dec. 17 as a reward for collecting the most aluminum cans during a month-long recycling project. The school collected 25,785 cans. Proceeds from the sale of the cans were donated to the Salvation Army. The Ronald McDonald House at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City received the donation of the pull tabs from the cans.


Horace Mann students work to benefit civic causes

By Hope Lecchi

[email protected]

Dr Todd Fraley, principal at Horace Mann Elementary, hangs on the wall of the gymnasium at the school Dec. 17. Fraley agreed to the task after his students collected 25,785 aluminum cans during a month long can drive. Throughout the fall, students at the school have completed numerous service learning projects to benefit area civic organizations.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_tsd122415horacemann1.jpgDr Todd Fraley, principal at Horace Mann Elementary, hangs on the wall of the gymnasium at the school Dec. 17. Fraley agreed to the task after his students collected 25,785 aluminum cans during a month long can drive. Throughout the fall, students at the school have completed numerous service learning projects to benefit area civic organizations.

Students from Horace Mann fill a truck with aluminum cans in the school’s parking lot. The money collected from the recycling of the cans was donated to the Salvation Army. Ditzfeld Transfer Inc. donated the use of a tractor trailer to the school to deliver the cans to the local recycling center.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_tsd122415horacemann2.jpgStudents from Horace Mann fill a truck with aluminum cans in the school’s parking lot. The money collected from the recycling of the cans was donated to the Salvation Army. Ditzfeld Transfer Inc. donated the use of a tractor trailer to the school to deliver the cans to the local recycling center.

Students from Bonnie Wolfe’s fourth grade class duct tape their principal, Dr. Todd Fraley, to the wall at Horace Mann Elementary on Dec. 17 as a reward for collecting the most aluminum cans during a month-long recycling project. The school collected 25,785 cans. Proceeds from the sale of the cans were donated to the Salvation Army. The Ronald McDonald House at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City received the donation of the pull tabs from the cans.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_tsd122415horacemann3.jpgStudents from Bonnie Wolfe’s fourth grade class duct tape their principal, Dr. Todd Fraley, to the wall at Horace Mann Elementary on Dec. 17 as a reward for collecting the most aluminum cans during a month-long recycling project. The school collected 25,785 cans. Proceeds from the sale of the cans were donated to the Salvation Army. The Ronald McDonald House at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City received the donation of the pull tabs from the cans.

Although they may be small, when compared to the size of an adult, the 320 students at Horace Mann Elementary have proven there is nothing small about their ability and willingness to help others.

During the fall, the students have been working diligently on educational studies but the students and staff know that not every lesson can be found in a textbook.

“We use the word ‘family’ a lot here,” Principal Dr. Todd Fraley said. “It’s the people in this building and their love for children that helps inspire all of our students to exceed in whatever they set their minds to.

“I really think we have an ideal size school,” Fraley added. “And because of that we work on the development of relationships with our students.”

That work has paid off to the benefit of several community organizations.

Students at the school have taken part in several service learning projects including an October food drive that benefited the Central Missouri Food Bank. During the week-long collection period Oct. 19-23, the students collected more than 1,500 cans of food.

They used the math skills and art concepts to construct a “Despicable Me” minion using 584 of the cans.

For their next project, the students spent a month collecting aluminum cans. In early December the students had collected slightly more than 10,000 cans.

In one week they doubled that figure, collecting an additional 15,785 cans.

As a reward for their efforts, the students eagerly watched as Fraley was duct-taped to the wall during an all-school assembly the day before the students started their holiday break.

Students from Bonnie Wolfe’s fourth grade class had the honor of taping Fraley to the wall because they collected the most cans during the drive.

“I think our students need to work a little on their duct-taping skills,” Fraley said with a laugh shortly after the assembly. “I was only on the wall for a little while before the tape didn’t hold and I hit the ground.”

The fall was for two good causes, so Fraley did not seem to mind.

“The money from the cans will be given to the Salvation Army,” Fraley said. “The students also pulled off the tabs from the cans and donated those to the Ronald McDonald House at Children’s Mercy (Hospital in Kansas City).”

Second grade students spent time creating crafts and food items that they in turn sell to students throughout the school at their Santa’s Workshop.

Amy Carbone-Scott’s students make all of the items that were for sale. The proceeds were donated to Operation Gratitude, which helps active military members and veterans.

It helps the students have a way to buy inexpensive gifts for their friends and family.

Fraley referred back to one of his first comments about the success of the school.

“I can’t thank the parents and the students and staff here at this school enough,” Fraley said. “They are amazing and we are a family here; I truly believe that.

“They will come to me with an idea and all they need from me is the approval to do it,” Fraley added. “They all work together to help one another and they get things done in an amazing way to help others.”

Hope Lecchi can be reached at 660-826-1000 ext. 1484

Sedalia Democrat

Hope Lecchi can be reached at 660-826-1000 ext. 1484

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