Sedalia Visual Art Association show opens at Municipal Building


By Faith Bemiss - [email protected]



Artist Scott Linsenbardt talks about how he and his sister, Janice Hargrave, created a collaborative work titled, “Three Sisters,” Saturday at the Sedalia Municipal Building. The brother/sister team were hanging work for the Sedalia Visual Art Association show that will be exhibited through April at the Municipal Building.


Artist Janice Hargrave holds her three-dimensional piece called “Treasure Casket” that represents what one may find in a late loved one’s home at the end of life. The piece will be on exhibit at the Municipal Building through April in the SVAA art show.


Scott Linsenbardt, who has an eye for photography, created numerous photos for the SVAA exhibit including this piece titled “The Four Seasons-Summer.”


Janice Hargrave’s paintin,g “Cast Iron Skillet,” was painted in response to an interpretive art show at the Columbia Art League in Columbia. It is embellished with vintage ads from the ’50s and ’60s.


By Faith Bemiss

[email protected]

Artist Scott Linsenbardt talks about how he and his sister, Janice Hargrave, created a collaborative work titled, “Three Sisters,” Saturday at the Sedalia Municipal Building. The brother/sister team were hanging work for the Sedalia Visual Art Association show that will be exhibited through April at the Municipal Building.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_TSD030716ArtShow-1.jpgArtist Scott Linsenbardt talks about how he and his sister, Janice Hargrave, created a collaborative work titled, “Three Sisters,” Saturday at the Sedalia Municipal Building. The brother/sister team were hanging work for the Sedalia Visual Art Association show that will be exhibited through April at the Municipal Building.

Artist Janice Hargrave holds her three-dimensional piece called “Treasure Casket” that represents what one may find in a late loved one’s home at the end of life. The piece will be on exhibit at the Municipal Building through April in the SVAA art show.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_TSD030716ArtShow-2.jpgArtist Janice Hargrave holds her three-dimensional piece called “Treasure Casket” that represents what one may find in a late loved one’s home at the end of life. The piece will be on exhibit at the Municipal Building through April in the SVAA art show.

Scott Linsenbardt, who has an eye for photography, created numerous photos for the SVAA exhibit including this piece titled “The Four Seasons-Summer.”
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_TSD030716ArtShow-3.jpgScott Linsenbardt, who has an eye for photography, created numerous photos for the SVAA exhibit including this piece titled “The Four Seasons-Summer.”

Janice Hargrave’s paintin,g “Cast Iron Skillet,” was painted in response to an interpretive art show at the Columbia Art League in Columbia. It is embellished with vintage ads from the ’50s and ’60s.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_TSD030716ArtShow-4.jpgJanice Hargrave’s paintin,g “Cast Iron Skillet,” was painted in response to an interpretive art show at the Columbia Art League in Columbia. It is embellished with vintage ads from the ’50s and ’60s.

A small memory “casket,” paintings, photography and collaborative pieces is a sampling of the art visitors will see when they visit the Sedalia Municipal Building during the Sedalia Visual Art Association show now exhibiting through the end of April.

The work has been created by the local and well-known brother-and-sister team, Scott Linsenbardt and Janice Hargrave. Linsenbart and Hargrave are known for painstakingly creating the butter cow sculpture each year at the Missouri State Fair.

The duo, members of the Sedalia Visual Art Association, has been creating art together since they were children.

“I remember growing up and we’d be doing artwork on the table …,” Linsenbardt said.

“Our family has always been makers,” Hargrave added. “We are a family of makers. I was always making stuff, people were always making stuff, growing, building.”

Hargrave is now an art teacher at Parkview Elementary School and Linsenbardt owns his own company, Scott’s Carpentry.

The siblings have created a non-objective, oil painting collaborative titled “Three Sisters” that they plan to hang for the show. Linsenbardt and Hargrave first added tape to the pieces then applied texture, removed the tape and applied color last.

“We were trying to get ourselves back into textures,” Linsenbardt said. “We were looking for a sort of harmony.”

Linsenbardt bought some canvases and they set them up in the garage and began to experiment with textures, creating one to two dozen pieces in the process. They selected three from that series to be represented in the show.

Linsebardt also has an eye for photography. One photo in particular, a black-and-white of several eggs, comes with an interesting story.

“We had this wreath on the front of our door,” he said. “At one point we noticed a nest in there. We really didn’t want to take down the nest so we just let it stay there, and she raised a brood of little chicks.”

The bird, a small warbler, soon became adjusted to the door opening and closing.

“A one point the door was open and the bird came in for the nest and came right into the house,” he added. “She was looking around like, ‘something’s wrong here.’”

Linsenbardt was able to photograph a close-up of the eggs and create soft focus by moving slowing in with the lens, giving the piece a surreal feel.

“I love the soft focus on it,” Hargrave said. “It gives that whole idea of the potential and movement of the life inside.”

One of Hargrave’s larger pieces is an eye-catching acrylic painting of fried chicken titled “Cast Iron Skillet.”

“I created the fried chicken piece in response to the interpretation show at the Columbia Art League,” she noted. “A writer submits writing and you do a response piece. Then the artist submits an art piece and they do a response writing.”

The piece is mixed media with vintage advertisements embellishing the chicken.

“It fits with this time period, the ’50s and ’60s,” Hargrave added.

A thought provoking three-dimensional piece of Hargrave’s is titled, “Treasure Casket.”

“It is again in response to one of those interpretation shows,” she said.

She explained the box contains a collection of small items. When a person dies often family members go to clean out a loved one’s home or room. The box represents what one may find during that process.

“You have this collection of things that are unusual and are memories of them,” she added. “It’s got a lot of old photographs, it’s got a lock in there, some ceramic pieces, some old tatting, and then a little mummified mouse.”

Yes, a real mummified mouse courtesy of her brother.

“Scott found it,” she said laughing. “Scott had that mummified mouse and I thought ‘it needs to be in there!’”

She added that those are the types of things you find after many years when cleaning up a late loved one’s home at the end of life. The good, the bad, the ugly.

“It’s just kind of a way to memorialize what you see at the end,” Hargrave said.

The small box was also painted by Hargrave with thought in mind.

“I wanted it to be like a Roman or Greek sarcophagus,” she said. “So, I imitated some of that on the outside of the box.”

Hargrave’s piece, a pastel and watercolor of a utility truck called “A Working Man’s Blues,” was made with a nice pattern of diagonal shadows.

“It’s one of my favorite things, those diagonal shadows,” she said. “I just thought I would really like to celebrate people that work. The colors were just so fantastic and the shadows were beautiful on the truck.”

Linsenbardt’s “GG9” is an intriguing photographic view of dog’s eye with snow in the background. The piece is made up of nine separate panels.

“My brother owned a Weimaraner named Gigi,” Linsenbardt said. “One day it snowed a bunch, and they let it out, (and) it was going crazy and having fun. I took my camera out and started shooting the dog.”

After photographing the dog, and as he zipped through the images, Linsenbardt found one where only a portion of the Weimaraner’s eye was left in the frame. He almost deleted it from the camera.

“Then I thought, I might be able to use this,” he added.

Using the original as a base, he created nine different color toned photos for the piece.

Linsenbardt and Hargrave were unsure how many pieces they will have in the show, but emphasized there will a variety of media represented.

Linsenbardt and Hargrave’s exhibit is the third in a series of shows presented by members of the Sedalia Visual Arts Association. The show will run through April inside the Sedalia Municipal Building, 200 S. Osage Ave. The Municipal Building is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Sedalia Visual Art Association meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of the month in the basement of the Central Bank of Sedalia Annex, 403 W. Broadway. Blvd.

Faith Bemiss can be reached at 530-0289 or @flbemiss.

Sedalia Democrat

Faith Bemiss can be reached at 530-0289 or @flbemiss.

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