Rain arrives in Pettis County


Mild temperatures, rain predicted for upcoming week

By Hope Lecchi - [email protected]



Tyler Fizer, a sixth grade student at Smith-Cotton Junior High School, drops back for a pass during his physical education class last hour on Tuesday. Instructors at the junior high brought the students outside both Monday and Tuesday to take advantage of the warm weather and allow the students to get some fresh air and exercise.


The American flag flies against the backdrop of Smith-Cotton Junior High school Tuesday afternoon prior to the light rain that started around 3 p.m. Flags are to be flown at half mast in honor of former First Lady Nancy Reagan, who died Sunday at the age of 94, until her burial at 11 a.m. Friday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.


A cluster of daffodils blooms Tuesday on the grounds of the Smith-Cotton Junior High School. The National Weather Service in Kansas City posted this on its Facebook page Tuesday afternoon: “The temperatures (haven’t) fallen below freezing in KC since March 4, and it won’t do so again for at least the next week, possibly two weeks or longer. That is going to get flowers and trees blooming much earlier than normal this year which will put them at dangerous risk of a killing freeze later this spring. Our average last freeze is not until April 8.”


Karlie Franklin defends against Jacob Glankowski in a game of soccer during their afternoon PE class at Smith-Cotton Junior High School. The students had a number of activities to participate in during their class including football, soccer, volleyball and walking.


Kiser Pannier prepares to square up to bunt during her PE class Tuesday afternoon at Smith-Cotton Junior High School. Pannier, a sixth-grader, connected on the pitch and eventually scored later in the inning. With the forecast calling for rain throughout the remainder of the week, it may be the last opportunity for the students to participate in outdoor activities for several days.


Mild temperatures, rain predicted for upcoming week

By Hope Lecchi

[email protected]

Tyler Fizer, a sixth grade student at Smith-Cotton Junior High School, drops back for a pass during his physical education class last hour on Tuesday. Instructors at the junior high brought the students outside both Monday and Tuesday to take advantage of the warm weather and allow the students to get some fresh air and exercise.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd030916weather1.jpgTyler Fizer, a sixth grade student at Smith-Cotton Junior High School, drops back for a pass during his physical education class last hour on Tuesday. Instructors at the junior high brought the students outside both Monday and Tuesday to take advantage of the warm weather and allow the students to get some fresh air and exercise.

The American flag flies against the backdrop of Smith-Cotton Junior High school Tuesday afternoon prior to the light rain that started around 3 p.m. Flags are to be flown at half mast in honor of former First Lady Nancy Reagan, who died Sunday at the age of 94, until her burial at 11 a.m. Friday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd031916weather2.jpgThe American flag flies against the backdrop of Smith-Cotton Junior High school Tuesday afternoon prior to the light rain that started around 3 p.m. Flags are to be flown at half mast in honor of former First Lady Nancy Reagan, who died Sunday at the age of 94, until her burial at 11 a.m. Friday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

A cluster of daffodils blooms Tuesday on the grounds of the Smith-Cotton Junior High School. The National Weather Service in Kansas City posted this on its Facebook page Tuesday afternoon: “The temperatures (haven’t) fallen below freezing in KC since March 4, and it won’t do so again for at least the next week, possibly two weeks or longer. That is going to get flowers and trees blooming much earlier than normal this year which will put them at dangerous risk of a killing freeze later this spring. Our average last freeze is not until April 8.”
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd030916weather3.jpgA cluster of daffodils blooms Tuesday on the grounds of the Smith-Cotton Junior High School. The National Weather Service in Kansas City posted this on its Facebook page Tuesday afternoon: “The temperatures (haven’t) fallen below freezing in KC since March 4, and it won’t do so again for at least the next week, possibly two weeks or longer. That is going to get flowers and trees blooming much earlier than normal this year which will put them at dangerous risk of a killing freeze later this spring. Our average last freeze is not until April 8.”

Karlie Franklin defends against Jacob Glankowski in a game of soccer during their afternoon PE class at Smith-Cotton Junior High School. The students had a number of activities to participate in during their class including football, soccer, volleyball and walking.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd030916weather4.jpgKarlie Franklin defends against Jacob Glankowski in a game of soccer during their afternoon PE class at Smith-Cotton Junior High School. The students had a number of activities to participate in during their class including football, soccer, volleyball and walking.

Kiser Pannier prepares to square up to bunt during her PE class Tuesday afternoon at Smith-Cotton Junior High School. Pannier, a sixth-grader, connected on the pitch and eventually scored later in the inning. With the forecast calling for rain throughout the remainder of the week, it may be the last opportunity for the students to participate in outdoor activities for several days.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_tsd030916weather5.jpgKiser Pannier prepares to square up to bunt during her PE class Tuesday afternoon at Smith-Cotton Junior High School. Pannier, a sixth-grader, connected on the pitch and eventually scored later in the inning. With the forecast calling for rain throughout the remainder of the week, it may be the last opportunity for the students to participate in outdoor activities for several days.

With temperatures in the upper 60s to low 70s and the possibility of rain each day throughout the week, it may seem spring has arrived.

Spring officially arrives March 20, but that hasn’t prevented several signs of spring from popping up throughout Sedalia and Pettis County.

The National Weather Service is calling for a possibility of rain or thunderstorms each day this week in Pettis County, with the greatest chance coming Tuesday night through Wednesday evening. The chance of rain both days is 80 percent.

“I really don’t think we have much to be concerned about with the rain this week,” said Dave Clippert, director of Sedalia-Pettis County Emergency Management Agency. “They are not calling for large amounts for us this week but hopefully we will get some good rain out of this.”

Despite what University of Missouri Extension Agricultural Business Specialist Brent Carpenter called “a lot of coffee shop talk,” Pettis County is not in a drought.

“I just looked at the latest map from Feb. 26 and there really is nothing (regarding drought conditions) in the Midwest,” Carpenter said. “We’re watching things closely and if we get the rain they are calling for this week that will be setting us up pretty good for spring planting.”

Carpenter said he expects to see some work in fields in late March and early April by area farmers.

“(Farmers) will be taking some risks if they are out in the fields that early but they know that,” Carpenter said. “It’s been warmer and drier than usual and that makes people want to get out.”

In Tuesday’s long-range forecast from the National Weather Service, between a quarter- to a half-inch of rain is predicted each day for Pettis County. Higher daily totals are predicted if the area sees storms, which are possible Tuesday night into Wednesday.

The forecasted temperatures range from overnight lows in the upper 40s and lower 50s. Daytime highs are predicted in the mid to upper 60s throughout the week and into early next week.

While many residents are enjoying recent weather trends, a meteorological change they may not be looking forward to will occur Sunday as daylight saving time begins this weekend.

Citizens will need to set their clocks forward one hour before going to bed Saturday night, meaning they will lose an hour’s sleep.

A recent bill passed by the Missouri House of Representatives would allow the state to permanently stay on daylight saving time if a minimum of 19 other states also adopt the legislation.

HB340, named the “Daylight Savings as the New Standard Time Pact,” needs senate approval and the governor’s signature as well as the approval of 19 other states before becoming law.

The senate has until May 17, the last day of the legislative session, to vote on the measure.

Hope Lecchi can be reached at 660-826-1000 ext. 1984

Sedalia Democrat

Hope Lecchi can be reached at 660-826-1000 ext. 1984

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