Last updated: June 18. 2014 7:22PM - 276 Views
By - jstrickland@civitasmedia.com



Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

For a couple of hours each day during this week’s four-day Sacred Heart basketball camp, area third through sixth graders have been getting basketball instruction from Sacred Heart boy’s basketball coach Steve Goodwin and some of his Class 2 state champion varsity players.


“When they just saw the high school win a state championship they tend to listen a little bit more,” Goodwin said during Wednesday’s session. “They really take into what they are trying to show them and teach them.”


Wednesday was the third of four days for the camp, which included a free throw competition and a hotshot drill.


“Then at the end of the camp we’ll scrimmage and they’ll play,” Goodwin said. “If we see things they are doing wrong we’ll try to correct them. Kind of show them how they are going to play here when they get to high school. Aggressive, good defense, rebounding.”


While Goodwin was keeping score of the hotshot competition, varsity Gremlins Cal Racy, Chase and Trent Lyles, and Garrett Strange were each instructing a small group of kids at each basket in the gym.


“I like what coach does because he helps these kids every year and just gets them introduced to the program,” Chase Lyles said.


More than 20 kids participated in the camp, including Cal Racy’s brother, Tyler.


“We’re learning a lot of fundamentals,” Tyler said. “We are learning a lot of new drills and how to shoot the basketball.”


Tyler said he is pretty good at free throws, but added that his dribbling is his best skill.


He knows a lot of the Gremlin players, so he said they mess around with him at times during the camp.


“They say funny jokes to me a lot,” he said.


Chase said he’s been helping with the camp since he was a freshman three years ago.


“I think they really look up to us,” he said. “They come to our games and watch us play. I think they listen to everything we have to say to them.”


Since Goodwin has been doing the camp for 16 years, he said he’s seen players grow up from attending the camp to becoming varsity players.


Chase said his favorite part of the camp is seeing the progression of the players.


“I like getting to see where they start and getting to see where they finish whenever they get older,” he said. “That’s the best thing for me.”

Comments
comments powered by Disqus


Featured Businesses


Poll



Info Minute