Last updated: July 04. 2014 3:21PM - 267 Views

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Dear Editor:


In spite of heroic efforts of law enforcement, prosecuting attorneys, judges and other criminal justice individuals as revealed by candidates speaking at the recent Junteenth Celebration held Saturday, June 21 at Hubbard Park, it was obvious to most that we’ve either lost or are in the process of losing the “war on drugs.”


We are probably where society was in the early 1900s when a midst great despair and worry, Prohibition was repealed.


Surprisingly enough, to most at least, repealing Prohibition basically worked.


I believe we’re at the same juncture with drugs. On the Northside, the location of the Rose M. Nolen Black History Library, I see first hand the devastation that drug use/sales/incarceration has wrought upon this community.


In my thinking, legalizing/de-criminalizing drugs needs to be seriously considered.


Society and relationships can bring lots of pressure to bear on those folks involved with drugs. As society and alcohol came to an understanding, so can society and drugs.


Once these regulations are in place (the price of drugs, the place to buy drugs, who can buy them, etc.) and the huge amounts of money removed from the illicit drug equation, the whole illegal drug market/cartel would likely collapse. People could then be restored to sanity/mend relationships (no more snitching) and be about the business of enjoying life/family and community.


Think about it — and share your thoughts with these candidates. They are desperate also to find a solution that is tearing the United States apart and particularly Sedalia and consuming much needed financial resources. At the moment The Prison Industrial Complex employs more people than all the Walmarts combined — and the majority of the inmates are in for drug offenses.


Dr. Margaret L. Harlan


Retired Psychologist

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