Rookie Reporters: S-C girls soccer to kick for a cure again


By Lexi Venable - Smith-Cotton High School



Bothwell Regional Health Center President and CEO Jimmy Robertson displays a special game ball signed by the Smith-Cotton Lady Tigers soccer team before the annual Kickin’ It For a Cure fundraiser game last April at Susie Ditzfeld Memorial Soccer Complex. Looking on is Lady Tigers defender Darby Christian.


Photo courtesy of Sedalia School District 200

Since 2009, Smith-Cotton girls soccer team has put on “Kickin’ It For a Cure,” an annual fundraiser game to support breast cancer research. Coach Adam Murray explains that this fundraiser began with former coaches Travis and Shawn Cairer and he has since kept it going since he took over the program four years ago.

Murray said the fundraiser is a great opportunity for the team to come together and raise money for a great cause. This year’s game is on May 4 at Susie Ditzfeld Memorial Soccer Complex against conference rival Warrensburg.

Olivia Greer, a senior this year on the S-C girls soccer team, has been participating in this fundraiser throughout her high school years. She said the fundraiser is very important to her and her teammates.

“We’re doing something that matters,” she said. However, both Greer and Murray know that this goes deeper than what some people may see.

“We have also had players’ moms who have battled breast cancer,” said Murray. “So I feel like this not only supports breast cancer research, but it also shows support for our own girls and the families who have been impacted by this disease.”

The team has taken different creative approaches to raise money for this cause each year. Murray said the team has sold wristbands and T-shirts, as well as auctioned off toolboxes, player jerseys, and pink soccer balls that were used during the game. This year, the team put together a raffle that was suggested by Adam Braverman, the father of Reagan Braverman, a sophomore on the team. He was able to get a signed Manchester City team jersey and FC Barcelona pennant after contacting the clubs, who agreed to donate the items. Murray believes that their first year of doing this raffle will be a success, and hopes these items will generate a lot of interest, hopefully exceeding the previous amounts raised.

The team usually raises between $5,000 and $10,000 each year. Greer’s main goal for this season was to raise as much money as possible, and to maybe even set a record. All of the money that is raised is donated to the Bothwell Regional Health Center’s Cancer Center.

“We are extremely thankful and fortunate to be working with a program that does so much to help the cancer foundation,” said Lauren Thiel, executive director of the Bothwell Regional Health Center Foundation.

The Lady Tigers have high expectations for this cause and look forward to continuing the fundraiser in the future.

“We would love for everyone to help support our effort by buying a shirt, raffle ticket, or just coming out on May 4th to watch the game,” Murray said.

Bothwell Regional Health Center President and CEO Jimmy Robertson displays a special game ball signed by the Smith-Cotton Lady Tigers soccer team before the annual Kickin’ It For a Cure fundraiser game last April at Susie Ditzfeld Memorial Soccer Complex. Looking on is Lady Tigers defender Darby Christian.
http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/web1_GSOC.KickinForCure.jpgBothwell Regional Health Center President and CEO Jimmy Robertson displays a special game ball signed by the Smith-Cotton Lady Tigers soccer team before the annual Kickin’ It For a Cure fundraiser game last April at Susie Ditzfeld Memorial Soccer Complex. Looking on is Lady Tigers defender Darby Christian. Photo courtesy of Sedalia School District 200

http://sedaliademocrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/web1_Tiger.Badge_-8.jpgPhoto courtesy of Sedalia School District 200

By Lexi Venable

Smith-Cotton High School

Lexi Venable is a student at Smith-Cotton High School

Lexi Venable is a student at Smith-Cotton High School

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